Setting Up and Running a Charity

first_imgSetting Up and Running a Charity Tagged with: Law / policy Management AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Howard Lake | 19 November 2008 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Five Star Government Forum Unites Banking and Government Leaders

first_img Related Articles Five Star Government Forum Unites Banking and Government Leaders Tagged with: Fannie Mae FHFA Five Star Government Forum Freddie Mac FSGF Ginnie Mae Government GSE HUD Lenders mortgage Secretary Ben Carson Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. April 2, 2018 2,515 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago About Author: Radhika Ojha Home / Daily Dose / Five Star Government Forum Unites Banking and Government Leaders Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Construction Spending on the Upswing Next: Fannie Mae Completes 2018’s First Credit Insurance Risk Transfer Housing and housing finance reforms, especially for the underserved, will be top of the agenda at the ninth annual Five Star Government Forum on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Leaders in mortgage banking and the federal government will engage and have an open dialogue about the most pressing issues being faced by the industry at this day-long forum.The Five Star Government Forum will begin with a side-by-side conversation between United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Dr. Benjamin Carson and Five Star Institute President and CEO Ed Delgado. Delgado will ask Carson about the future of HUD, housing affordability, and working with the mortgage industry for the greater benefit of homeowners. With representation from FHFA, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and Ginnie Mae, this year’s Government Forum speakers have played an integral role in providing quality leadership to the federal government and the mortgage industry.Peter J. Wallison, Senior Fellow and Arthur F. Burns Fellow in Financial Policy Studies, American Enterprise Institute, will present the morning keynote. He has held several prominent positions in the federal government, including serving as White House Counsel to the President of the United States, as well as General Counsel for the United States Department of Treasury, where he played a significant role in the development of proposals for the deregulation of the financial services industry. The Hon. Edward DeMarco will lead the afternoon keynote. He is President of the Housing Policy Council Financial Services Roundtable. He served as the acting Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) immediately following the crisis from 2009 to 2014, overseeing the conservatorship of the GSEs. “The Five Star Government Forum is an important event for our industry because it serves as a platform to foster and grow the collaborative working relationship between regulatory authorities and the industry stakeholders for the benefit of homeowners,” said Ed Delgado, President and CEO of the Five Star Institute. “We look forward to hosting Secretary Carson and many other leaders.”Above: Five Star President & CEO Ed Delgado on stage with HUD Secretary Dr. Benjamin Carson at the 2018 Five Star Government Forum. Via the Twitter feed of Charles Tassell. in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Subscribe Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily  Print This Post Share Save Fannie Mae FHFA Five Star Government Forum Freddie Mac FSGF Ginnie Mae Government GSE HUD Lenders mortgage Secretary Ben Carson 2018-04-02 Radhika Ojhalast_img read more

A bleak situation for Donegal Gardai – GRA

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp There were 200 less Gardaí recruited this year than originally planned, according to the Garda Representative Association.It says the lack of resources available to members along the border area is affecting their ability to fight criminal activity.Cross border agency cooperation will be among the topics today at the annual Cross Border Conference on Organised Crime in Cavan, which the Garda Commissioner and PSNI Chief Constable are attending.GRA Donegal spokesperson, Brendan O’Connor, says action needs to be taken:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/ocondfgdfgdfgnor8am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Pinterest A bleak situation for Donegal Gardai – GRA By News Highland – September 25, 2019 AudioHomepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA center_img Previous articlePlans in motion to secure future of Bád EddieNext articleMcGeehan and McGeever named on Tipp Management News Highland Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Twitter Pinterest Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

Elmore celebrates 100 years of loving life

first_img The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Latest Stories As hard as it was for anyone to believe, Susie Elmore celebrated her 100th birthday Thursday afternoon with family and friends at Noble Manor.“Don’t we all wish we could live to be 100 and look like Miss Susie?” Dale Law asked.“Miss Susie,” laughing, said she won’t actually be 100 years old until March 2, but she was celebrating early in order to be in Phenix City on Saturday for a big celebration there and to attend church on Sunday. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Susie Elmore celebrates her 100th birthday with Ruth Henderson, Grover Garrett and Janette Wesley. Elmore had a proclamation from Rep. Wes Allen in her honor Thursday during the reception in her honor. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Sponsored Content Published 10:13 pm Thursday, February 28, 2019 Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Elmore celebrates 100 years of loving life Skip By Jaine Treadwell Print Article She grew up in the Enon community and attended school in Brundidge. She met Julius Elmore, a young man from South Carolina, fell in love and married. They lived much of their married life in Phenix City. She worked at a bank for 20 years and with an elevator service for 10 years.Mrs. Elmore said she is happy to be back home in Pike County and enjoys her family and friends and all the wonderful people at Noble Manor.“I’ve had a good life,” she said. “We didn’t have any children so my husband and I spent all of our time together. I didn’t want to do anything else. I was just happy with us being together.”Mrs. Elmore flew in an airplane one time and that was enough.“The noise was so loud that it made my head hurt and I never wanted to fly in an airplane again,” she said. “I never did.”Celebrating 100 years is an event that only a few get to enjoy and, even fewer, to enjoy it “so beautifully.”Mrs. Elmore shared her “beauty secret.”“I take care of my skin,” she said. “I never wash my face with soap. I use Pond Cleansing Cream.” Mrs. Elmore remembers how cold old houses were when the only heat was a wood-burning fireplace. She remembers milking cows and hauling clothes to the spring for washing.“We hoed cotton and stacked peanuts,  picked cotton and shook peanuts. We had to sweep the yard and we had to sweep in a straight line, no curved marks in the dirt.”The girls in the family helped with the housework and in the garden, with the picking of the peas and beans and the shelling.It was a hard life but Mrs. Elmore said they didn’t know there was any other way. You Might Like By The Penny Hoarder Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits State Rep. Wes Allen escorted the honoree into the dining area where friends and family were waiting to sing the birthday song and congratulate her. Allen read a proclamation from the Alabama House of Representatives congratulating Elmore. John Henderson, a nephew, read congratulations from Gov. Kay Ivey and brought wishes for health and happiness from Troy Mayor Jason A. Reeves.Mrs. Elmore quickly said the greatest and most beneficial change she has seen in her 100 years is electricity. Running, perhaps, a close second is a flushing toilet.There were 10 children in Mrs. Elmore’s family. Her family was poor she said, but they didn’t know it. Her mother was 13 and her dad was 17 when they married. Their first child was born two years later. The last child came when Mrs. Elmore’s mother was 40 – 25 years to have 10 children  – so Mrs. Elmore said she always enjoyed having family around and a lot of love. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Treasure Forest association gives awards The Pike County Chapter of the Alabama TREASURE Forest Association hosted its annual chapter meeting Thursday in the Fellowship Hall… read more Email the author Book Nook to reopenlast_img read more

Vermont continues to have by far the lowest foreclosure rate in US

first_img          U.S.                    889,829       144    10.75     20.29      —  —-                    ——-       —    —–     —–       27  Alabama                   6,404       334    74.54   250.14*      —  ——-                   —–       —    —–   ——-      34  Alaska                      588       480     6.72     16.21      —  ——                      —       —     —-     —–       4  Arizona                  47,914        56    -2.45     28.70       –  ——-                  ——        —    —–     —–      23  Arkansas                  4,640       277     1.29     33.56      —  ——–                  —–       —     —-     —–       2  California              253,905        52     9.96     25.32       –  ———-              ——-        —     —-     —–       9  Colorado                 14,597       146    15.80    -10.08       –  ——–                 ——       —    —–    ——      33  Connecticut               3,028       475   -48.47    -38.77      —  ———–               —–       —   ——    ——      32  Delaware                    853       456     3.02     40.99      —  ——–                    —       —     —-     —–          District           of           Columbia                   991       287    18.40    -15.66          ———–                 —       —    —–    ——       3  Florida                 158,043        55    32.56     44.42       –  ——-                 ——-        —    —–     —–       7  Georgia                  31,292       127     9.38     12.75       –  ——-                  ——       —     —-     —–      15  Hawaii                    2,126       238    36.81    328.63      —  ——                    —–       —    —–    ——       6  Idaho                     5,100       124    18.80    144.49       –  —–                     —–       —    —–    ——      10  Illinois                 32,786       160   -15.86     21.93      —  ——–                 ——       —   ——     —–      13  Indiana                  13,869       200    11.33     -0.15      —  ——-                  ——       —    —–     —–      41  Iowa                      1,656       803     5.34     19.83      —  —-                      —–       —     —-     —–      35  Kansas                    2,435       501    -4.55     24.17      —  ——                    —–       —    —–     —–      40  Kentucky                  2,844       670   63.92*    55.07*      —  ——–                  —–       —    —–     —–      38  Louisiana                 3,286       566   66.72*    73.68*      —  ———                 —–       —    —–     —–      42  Maine                       829       840     6.83      0.48      —  —–                       —       —     —-      —-      17  Maryland                  9,320       249     0.33     -1.40      —  ——–                  —–       —     —-     —–      19  Massachusetts            10,778       253    31.55    -33.36      —  ————-            ——       —    —–    ——       8  Michigan                 33,813       134     1.90      2.88       –  ——–                 ——       —     —-      —-      18  Minnesota                 9,134       252    27.34     61.01      —  ———                 —–       —    —–     —–      43  Mississippi               1,475       851    92.06    117.23      —  ————-             —–       —    —–    ——      29  Missouri                  7,290       363    -0.01   -24.66+      —  ——–                  —–       —    —–   ——-      48  Montana                     151     2,884    -1.31    -55.06      —  ——-                     —     —–    —–    ——      45  Nebraska                    418     1,868    88.29    -67.19      —  ——–                    —     —–    —–    ——       1  Nevada                   43,695        25     5.81     77.21       –  ——                   ——        —     —-     —–      25  New Hampshire             2,048       290    -7.96     17.84      —  ————-             —–       —    —–     —–      24  New Jersey               12,524       279     6.96    -27.56      —  ————-            ——       —     —-    ——      31  New Mexico                1,999       431  144.68*    73.83*      —  ————-             —–       —  ——-   ——-      39  New York                 13,664       581    24.03    -14.73      —  ——–                 ——       —    —–    ——      37  North Carolina            7,619       541    27.24    -27.51      —  ————-             —–       —    —–    ——      49  North Dakota                 88     3,529   -27.27    72.55*      —  ————-                —     —–   ——   ——-      11  Ohio                     31,117       163    -1.51    -17.44      —  —-                     ——       —    —–    ——      36  Oklahoma                  3,056       531     4.95    -21.36      —  ——–                  —–       —     —-    ——      12  Oregon                    9,635       167    -8.65    109.05      —  ——                    —–       —    —–    ——      30  Pennsylvania             13,220       414    12.06    27.03*      —  ————-            ——       —    —–   ——-      22  Rhode Island              1,659       272    -3.04     -0.06      —  ————-             —–       —    —–     —–      26  South Carolina            6,799       297    -3.09   113.87*      —  ————-             —–       —    —–   ——-      46  South Dakota                160     2,233    66.67     72.04      —  ————-               —     —–    —–     —–      21  Tennessee                10,477       260     1.11  -12.75++      —  ————-            ——       —     —-  ——–      28  Texas                    26,816       352     6.16     -7.88      —  —–                    ——       —     —-     —–       5  Utah                      8,436       110    37.33    111.91       –  —-                      —–       —    —–    ——      50  Vermont                      14    22,245   -33.33    -62.16      —  ——-                      —    ——   ——    ——      14  Virginia                 15,417       212     4.70     8.75+      —  ——–                 ——       —     —-      —-      16  Washington               11,194       245    15.25     45.00      —  ————-            ——       —    —–     —–      47  West Virginia               341     2,589     1.79     74.87      —  ————-               —     —–     —-     —–      20  Wisconsin                10,058       255    12.88    61.83*      —  ———                ——       —    —–     —–      44  Wyoming                     228     1,063     5.07     43.40      —  ——-                     —     —–     —-     —–                      Properties with Foreclosure Filings                    ———————————–                                                  % Change % Change    Rate     State                      1/every       from    from    Rank     Name               Total  X HU (rate)   May 09  Jun 08    —-     —–              —–    ——–  ——-  ——-     *  Actual increase may not be as high due to data collection changes or       improvements    +  Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state       was discontinued starting in January 2009    ++ Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state       was discontinued starting in September 2008 U.S. Foreclosure Market Data by State – Q2 2009                            Properties with Foreclosure Filings                            ———————————–     Rate  State     Rank  Name            NOD      LIS      NTS     NFS      REO     —- ——-          —      —      —     —      —       24  Alabama                 2,716       787    38.08  250.90*      —  ——-                 —–       —    —–  ——-      36  Alaska                    210     1,344     9.95     9.38      —  ——                    —     —–     —-     —-       3  Arizona                16,834       158    -0.18    29.99       –  ——-                ——       —    —–    —–      22  Arkansas                1,667       772    -0.24    48.05      —  ——–                —–       —    —–    —–       2  California            101,045       132     9.54    47.15       –  ———-            ——-       —     —-    —–       9  Colorado                5,724       372    17.39    17.34       –  ——–                —–       —    —–    —–      46  Connecticut               227     6,337   -79.48   -86.01      —  ———–               —     —–   ——   ——      29  Delaware                  341     1,140   -11.66    59.35      —  ——–                  —     —–   ——    —–          District           of           Columbia                 417       682    39.46   -19.65          ———–               —       —    —–   ——       4  Florida                52,899       165   -10.24    31.10       –  ——-                ——       —   ——    —–       6  Georgia                14,024       282    33.36    60.94       –  ——-                ——       —    —–    —–      19  Hawaii                    706       718   -13.48   426.87      —  ——                    —       —   ——   ——       8  Idaho                   1,881       335    30.26   182.43       –  —–                   —–       —    —–   ——      11  Illinois               10,796       486    -1.33    32.35      —  ——–               ——       —    —–    —–      13  Indiana                 5,568       499    12.30    14.78      —  ——-                 —–       —    —–    —–      41  Iowa                      560     2,374   -11.81    31.76      —  —-                      —     —–   ——    —–      33  Kansas                    958     1,273     6.56    59.93      —  ——                    —     —–     —-    —–      40  Kentucky                1,129     1,688     4.73   54.45*      —  ——–                —–     —–     —-    —–      34  Louisiana               1,452     1,280   54.30*  148.63*      —  ———               —–     —–    —–  ——-      42  Maine                     292     2,386   -10.15     5.80      —  —–                     —     —–   ——     —-      21  Maryland                3,100       748   -12.40    71.84      —  ——–                —–       —   ——    —–      26  Massachusetts           3,221       845   -11.05     6.27      —  ————-           —–       —   ——     —-       7  Michigan               13,607       333    -2.04    13.16       –  ——–               ——       —    —–    —–      18  Minnesota               3,332       692    12.99    96.69      —  ———               —–       —    —–    —–      39  Mississippi               755     1,662    73.96   122.71      —  ————-             —     —–    —–   ——      27  Missouri                3,112       851    11.30   -9.85+      —  ——–                —–       —    —–    —–      47  Montana                    62     7,025    67.57   -34.04      —  ——-                   —     —–    —–   ——      45  Nebraska                  149     5,240   -11.83   -65.75      —  ——–                  —     —–   ——   ——       1  Nevada                 18,764        59     9.37   115.36       –  ——                 ——        —     —-   ——      37  New Hampshire             438     1,356   -39.75   -12.92      —  ————-             —     —–   ——   ——      25  New Jersey              4,333       808    -1.70   -13.34      —  ————-           —–       —    —–   ——      31  New Mexico                710     1,214   -10.80   89.33*      —  ————-             —     —–   ——  ——-      38  New York                4,850     1,637     0.52    -9.63      —  ——–                —–     —–     —-    —–      35  North Carolina          3,175     1,299    22.73    -8.37      —  ————-           —–     —–    —–    —–      49  North Dakota               32     9,705    39.13   190.91      —  ————-             —     —–    —–   ——      10  Ohio                   11,252       450    -0.95   -14.72      —  —-                   ——       —    —–   ——      32  Oklahoma                1,295     1,253    47.66    10.40      —  ——–                —–     —–    —–    —–      14  Oregon                  3,113       517     1.50    52.08      —  ——                  —–       —     —-    —–      28  Pennsylvania            4,941     1,109    12.91   21.70*      —  ————-           —–     —–    —–  ——-      12  Rhode Island              912       494   128.57    53.79      —  ————-             —       —   ——    —–      30  South Carolina          1,686     1,199   -45.47   58.61*      —  ————-           —–     —–   ——  ——-      44  South Dakota              113     3,161  197.37*  289.66*      —  ————-             —     —–  ——-  ——-      15  Tennessee               4,675       583    30.99   7.27++      —  ———               —–       —    —–    —–      23  Texas                  12,023       785    22.52     8.79      —  —–                  ——       —    —–     —-       5  Utah                    3,471       267    18.59   131.25       –  —-                    —–       —    —–   ——      50  Vermont                    11    28,312    83.33   -66.67      —  ——-                   —    ——    —–   ——      17  Virginia                5,188       631    -3.66   -1.27+      —  ——–                —–       —    —–    —–      16  Washington              4,678       587    22.05   70.61*      —  ————-           —–       —    —–  ——-      48  West Virginia             114     7,743    12.87    35.71      —  ————-             —     —–    —–    —–      20  Wisconsin               3,531       725     0.83   49.43*      —  ———               —–       —     —-    —–      43  Wyoming                    84     2,885     3.70     7.69      —  ——-                   —     —–     —-     —-       24  Alabama             0       0    1,966       0     750      —  ——-           —     —    —–     —     —      36  Alaska              0       0      165       0      45      —  ——            —     —      —     —     —       3  Arizona            12       0   11,263       0   5,559       –  ——-           —     —   ——     —   —–      22  Arkansas          143       0    1,062       0     462      —  ——–          —     —    —–     —     —       2  California     44,258       0   36,145       0  20,642       –  ———-     ——     —   ——     —  ——       9  Colorado            6       0    4,004       0   1,714       –  ——–          —     —    —–     —   —–      46  Connecticut         0      56        0     115      56      —  ———–       —     —      —     —     —      29  Delaware            0       0        0     235     106      —  ——–          —     —      —     —     —          District           of           Columbia         186       0      155       0      76          ———–       —     —      —     —     —       4  Florida             0  32,220        0  13,312   7,367       –  ——-           —  ——      —  ——   —–       6  Georgia             1       0   11,050       0   2,973       –  ——-           —     —   ——     —   —–      19  Hawaii            155       0      460       0      91      —  ——            —     —      —     —     —       8  Idaho           1,098       0      745       0      38       –  —–           —–     —      —     —     —      11  Illinois            0   3,648        0   3,998   3,150      —  ——–          —   —–      —   —–   —–      13  Indiana             0   1,776        0   2,282   1,510      —  ——-           —   —–      —   —–   —–      41  Iowa                0       0      266       0     294      —  —-              —     —      —     —     —      33  Kansas              0     215        0     491     252      —  ——            —     —      —     —     —      40  Kentucky            0     415        0     414     300      —  ——–          —     —      —     —     —      34  Louisiana           0     131        0   1,046     275      —  ———         —     —      —   —–     —      42  Maine               0      99        0     157      36      —  —–             —     —      —     —     —      21  Maryland            0   2,251        0     246     603      —  ——–          —   —–      —     —     —      26  Massachusetts       0   2,048        0     771     402      —  ————-     —   —–      —     —     —       7  Michigan            0       0    7,965       0   5,642       –  ——–          —     —    —–     —   —–      18  Minnesota           7       0    1,736       0   1,589      —  ———         —     —    —–     —   —–      39  Mississippi         0       0      441       0     314      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      27  Missouri            1       0    1,567       0   1,544      —  ——–          —     —    —–     —   —–      47  Montana             0       0        2       0      60      —  ——-           —     —      —     —     —      45  Nebraska            0     128        0       3      18      —  ——–          —     —      —     —     —       1  Nevada          8,726       0    6,252       0   3,786       –  ——          —–     —    —–     —   —–      37  New Hampshire       0       0      417       0      21      —  ————-     —     —      —     —      —      25  New Jersey          0   2,405        0   1,325     603      —  ————-     —   —–      —   —–     —      31  New Mexico          0     303        0     273     134      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      38  New York            0   3,614        0     756     480      —  ——–          —   —–      —     —     —      35  North Carolina    767       0    1,184       0   1,224      —  ————-     —     —    —–     —   —–      49  North Dakota        0       0        0      19      13      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      10  Ohio                0   4,121        0   3,981   3,150      —  —-              —   —–      —   —–   —–      32  Oklahoma          445       0      532       0     318      —  ——–          —     —      —     —     —      14  Oregon             36       0    2,125       0     952      —  ——            —     —    —–     —     —      28  Pennsylvania        0   1,945        0   2,020     976      —  ————-     —   —–      —   —–     —      12  Rhode Island        0       0       30       0     882      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      30  South Carolina      0     996        0     214     476      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      44  South Dakota        0      81        0      30       2      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      15  Tennessee           0       0    2,782       0   1,893      —  ———         —     —    —–     —   —–      23  Texas              13       0    7,668       0   4,342      —  —–             —     —    —–     —   —–       5  Utah            1,170       0    1,571       0     730       –  —-            —–     —    —–     —     —      50  Vermont             0       0        0       0      11      —  ——-           —     —      —     —     —      17  Virginia            7       0    3,531       0   1,650      —  ——–          —     —    —–     —   —–      16  Washington          0       0    3,642       0   1,036      —  ————-     —     —    —–     —   —–      48  West Virginia       0       0      101       0      13      —  ————-     —     —      —     —     —      20  Wisconsin           0   1,719        0     934     878      —  ———         —   —–      —     —     —      43  Wyoming             0       0       48       0      36      —  ——-           —     —      —     —     —     *  Actual increase may not be as high due to data collection changes or       improvements    +  Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state       was discontinued starting in January 2009    ++ Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state       was discontinued starting in September 2008 U.S. Foreclosure Market Data by State – June 2009                        Properties with Foreclosure Filings                        ———————————–    Rate  State    Rank  Name             NOD     LIS     NTS      NFS    REO    —- ——-           —     —     —      —    — A national rating firm has once again ranked Vermont as having the lowest home foreclosure rate in the nation, based on second quarter and year-to-date numbers. Vermont has both the fewest foreclosures over the first half of the year and the lowest rate as a percentage of housing units. Vermont’s rate of foreclosure has actually improved this quarter against both the first quarter of this year and compared to the first six months of last year. For the first six months, Vermont’s rate was one foreclosure for every 8,898 housing units. The worst states continue to be the Nevada (one in 16) , Arizona ( one in 30) and Florida (one in 33), as far as having the highest rate of foreclosure and Nevada, Arizona and Florida have the highest number of foreclosures. Vermont’s rate was nearly six times lower than the next best state, North Dakota (one in 1,553).RealtyTrac((R)) (www.realtytrac.com(link is external)), the leading online marketplace for foreclosure properties, today released its Midyear 2009 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows a total of 1,905,723 foreclosure filings — default notices, auction sale notices and bank repossessions — were reported on 1,528,364 U.S. properties in the first six months of 2009, a 9 percent increase in total properties from the previous six months and a nearly 15 percent increase in total properties from the first six months of 2008. The report also shows that 1.19 percent of all U.S. housing units (one in 84) received at least one foreclosure filing in the first half of the year.Foreclosure filings were reported on 336,173 U.S. properties in June, the fourth straight monthly total exceeding 300,000 and helping to boost the second quarter total to the highest quarterly total since RealtyTrac began issuing its report in the first quarter of 2005. Foreclosure filings were reported on 889,829 U.S. properties in the second quarter, an increase of nearly 11 percent from the previous quarter and a 20 percent increase from the second quarter of 2008.”In spite of the industry-wide moratorium earlier this year, along with local, state and national legislative action and increased levels of loan modification activity, foreclosure activity continues to increase to record levels,” noted James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac. “Unemployment-related foreclosures account for much of this increased activity, and the high number of borrowers who find themselves owing more on their mortgages than their homes’ are now worth represent a potentially significant future risk. Stemming the tide of foreclosures is a critical component to stabilizing the housing market, so it is imperative that the lending industry and the government work in tandem to find new approaches to address this issue.”Nevada, Arizona, Florida post top state foreclosure ratesMore than 6 percent of Nevada housing units (one in 16) received at least one foreclosure filing in the first half of 2009, giving it the nation’s highest foreclosure rate during the six-month period. A total of 68,708 Nevada properties received a foreclosure filing from January to June, an increase of 23 percent from the previous six months and an increase of 61 percent from the first half of 2008.Arizona registered the nation’s second highest state foreclosure rate in the first half of 2009, with 3.37 percent of its housing units (one in 30) receiving at least one foreclosure filing, and Florida registered the nation’s third highest state foreclosure rate, with 3.08 percent of its housing units (one in 33) receiving at least one foreclosure filing.Other states with foreclosure rates ranking among the nation’s 10 highest were California (2.94 percent), Utah (1.46 percent), Georgia (1.42 percent), Michigan (1.34 percent), Illinois (1.31 percent), Idaho (1.26 percent) and Colorado (1.25 percent).California, Florida, Arizona post highest foreclosure totalsA total of 391,611 California properties received a foreclosure filing in the first half of 2009, the nation’s highest total and 2.94 percent of the state’s housing units (one in 34) — the nation’s fourth highest state foreclosure rate. California foreclosure activity in the first half of 2009 increased nearly 14 percent from the previous six months and increased nearly 15 percent from the first half of 2008.With 268,064 properties receiving a foreclosure filing in the first six months of 2009, Florida documented the second highest state total. Florida foreclosure activity in the first half of 2009 increased 7 percent from the previous six months and was up nearly 42 percent from the first half of 2008.Arizona’s 89,799 properties receiving a foreclosure filing in the first six months of 2009 was the third highest state total. Arizona foreclosure activity in the first half of 2009 increased 13 percent from the previous six months and was up nearly 55 percent from the first half of 2008.Other states with totals among the 10 highest in the country were Illinois (68,932), Nevada (68,708), Michigan (60,786), Ohio (58,937), Georgia (56,391), Texas (49,144) and Virginia (28,368).Report methodologyThe RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing reported during the first half of the year at the state and national level. Data is also available at the individual county level. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac’s report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default — Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction — Notice of Trustee Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). If more than one foreclosure document is filed against a property during six-month period, only the most recent filing is counted in the report.U.S. Foreclosure Market Data by State – Jan to Jun 2009                                                        % Change  % Change                          Total                           from      from    Rate              Properties     %Housing 1/every X  Jul-Dec   Jan-Jun    Rank   State Name with Filings      Units     HU        08        08    —-   ———- ————    ——-  ——— ——– ———-center_img           U.S.           57,031  58,171  108,875  32,622  79,474      —  —-           ——  ——  ——-  ——  ——     *   Actual increase may not be as high due to data collection changes or        improvements    +   Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state        was discontinued starting in January 2009    ++  Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state        was discontinued starting in September 2008 U.S. Foreclosure Rates Heat Map – June 2009(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090716/LA47428(link is external))About RealtyTrac Inc.Ranked as the third largest real estate site by MediaMetrix and No. 53 on Inc. magazine’s 2006 Inc. 500 list of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies, RealtyTrac Inc. (www.realtytrac.com(link is external)), is the leading online marketplace for foreclosure properties, providing all the resources that home seekers, investors and real estate agents need to locate, evaluate and buy properties below market value.Founded in 1996, RealtyTrac publishes the largest and most comprehensive national database of pre-foreclosure, foreclosure, For Sale By Owner, resale and new homes, with more than 1 million properties across the country, property reports, productivity tools and extensive professional resources. RealtyTrac hosts nearly 3 million unique visitors monthly and has been chosen to supply foreclosure data to MSN Real Estate, Yahoo! Real Estate and The Wall Street Journal’s Real Estate Journal. For current news and information regarding foreclosure-related issues and trends, visit our blog at www.ForeclosurePulse.com(link is external).Source: RealtyTrac.  IRVINE, Calif., July 16 /PRNewswire/       —      U.S.        1,528,364      1.19      84      9.46     14.66              —-        ———      —-      —      —-     —–       30 Alabama             9,657      0.45     221   125.47*   179.75*       — ——-             —–      —-     —    ——    ——       34 Alaska              1,072      0.38     263     -8.22     18.45       — ——              —–      —-     —     —–     —–        2 Arizona            89,799      3.37      30     13.28     54.51        – ——-            ——      —-      —     —–     —–       25 Arkansas            8,646      0.67     149      8.75     25.69       — ——–            —–      —-     —      —-     —–        4 California        391,611      2.94      34     13.69     14.52        – ———-        ——-      —-      —     —–     —–       10 Colorado           26,565      1.25      80     -0.70    -18.62       — ——–           ——      —-      —     —–    ——       27 Connecticut         8,801      0.61     163    -16.56    -31.18       — ———–         —–      —-     —    ——    ——       32 Delaware            1,559      0.40     249      0.26     32.01       — ——–            —–      —-     —      —-     —–          District           of           Columbia           1,776      0.62     160    -11.90    -31.06          ———–         —–      —-     —    ——    ——        3 Florida           268,064      3.07      33      7.16     41.95        – ——-           ——-      —-      —      —-     —–        6 Georgia            56,391      1.42      70     17.79     16.06        – ——-            ——      —-      —     —–     —–       18 Hawaii              3,603      0.71     141     53.19    296.81       — ——              —–      —-     —     —–    ——        9 Idaho               7,952      1.26      79     46.20   112.90*        – —–               —–      —-      —     —–    ——        8 Illinois           68,932      1.31      76     19.23     29.46        – ——–           ——      —-      —     —–     —–       13 Indiana            24,665      0.89     113     -2.89    -10.77       — ——-            ——      —-     —     —–    ——       41 Iowa                2,996      0.23     444      1.32      3.67       — —-                —–      —-     —      —-      —-       33 Kansas              4,660      0.38     262     17.71     43.61       — ——              —–      —-     —     —–     —–       40 Kentucky            4,356      0.23     438     -4.68    28.95*       — ——–            —–      —-     —     —–     —–       39 Louisiana           5,160      0.28     360    40.95*    34.38*       — ———           —–      —-     —     —–     —–       42 Maine               1,540      0.22     452     -6.95     10.63       — —–               —–      —-     —     —–     —–       15 Maryland           18,112      0.78     128      3.38      2.76       — ——–           ——      —-     —      —-      —-       23 Mass.              18,458      0.68     147      6.24    -43.73       — —–              ——      —-     —      —-    ——        7 Michigan           60,786      1.34      74      1.29     -1.28        – ——–           ——      —-      —      —-     —–       24 Minnesota          15,537      0.67     148     36.41     52.74       — ———          ——      —-     —     —–     —–       43 Mississippi         2,175      0.17     577     89.46    94.37*       — ———–         —–      —-     —     —– ———       28 Missouri           13,880      0.52     191   -17.13+   -21.11+       — ——–           ——      —-     —    ——    ——       48 Montana               290      0.07   1,502    -49.03    -59.61       — ——-               —      —-   —–    ——    ——       45 Nebraska              638      0.08   1,224    -48.92    -69.65       — ——–              —      —-   —–    ——    ——        1 Nevada             68,708      6.23      16     23.26     61.33        – ——             ——      —-      —     —–     —–       22 New Hampshire       4,044      0.68     147      5.23     24.16       — ———–         —–      —-     —      —-     —–       21 New Jersey         23,889      0.68     146    -29.28    -30.25       — ———-         ——      —-     —    ——    ——       37 New Mexico          2,631      0.31     328    43.69*    11.11*       — ———-          —–      —-     —     —–     —–       38 New York           24,210      0.30     328     10.67    -18.87       — ——–           ——      —-     —     —–    ——       36 North Carolina     12,642      0.31     326    -25.88    -37.91       — ———–        ——      —-     —    ——    ——       49 North Dakota          200      0.06   1,553    -24.24    85.19*       — ———–           —      —-   —–    —— ———       12 Ohio               58,937      1.16      86     -5.81    -14.76       — —-               ——      —-      —     —–    ——       35 Oklahoma            5,609      0.35     289    -13.49    -27.03       — ——–            —–      —-     —    ——    ——       11 Oregon             19,053      1.18      84     56.20    122.43       — ——             ——      —-      —     —–    ——       31 Pennsylvania       23,864      0.44     230      3.27    24.61*       — ————       ——      —-     —      —- ———       19 Rhode Island        3,172      0.70     142    -11.52     -7.95       — ————        —–      —-     —    ——     —–       26 South Carolina     13,145      0.65     154     33.32   125.12*       — ————       ——      —-     —     —– ———       47 South Dakota          256      0.07   1,395      4.92     59.01       — ————          —      —-   —–      —-     —–       16 Tennessee          20,365      0.75     134     -4.05  -20.96++       — ———          ——      —-     —     —–   ——-       29 Texas              49,144      0.52     192      6.25    -14.38       — —–              ——      —-     —      —-    ——        5 Utah               13,496      1.46      69     37.43     87.65        – —-               ——      —-      —     —–     —–       50 Vermont                35      0.01   8,898    -55.70    -42.62       — ——-                —      —-   —–    ——    ——       14 Virginia           28,368      0.87     115    -3.05+     3.76+       — ——–           ——      —-     —     —–      —-       17 Washington         19,855      0.72     138     23.17     43.01       — ———-         ——      —-     —     —–     —–       46 West Virginia         663      0.08   1,331    111.82     73.56       — ————          —      —-   —–    ——     —–       20 Wisconsin          17,984      0.70     142     70.92    49.69*       — ———          ——      —-     —     —–     —–       44 Wyoming               413      0.17     587    -10.22     43.40       — ——-               —      —-     —    ——     —–       —  U.S.           155,400  181,722  266,833  89,617  196,257          —-           ——-  ——-  ——-  ——  ——-      27  Alabama              1        0    4,847       0    1,556      —  ——-            —      —    —–     —    —–      34  Alaska               7        0      449       0      132      —  ——             —      —      —     —      —       4  Arizona             23        0   34,872       0   13,019       –  ——-             —      —   ——     —   ——      23  Arkansas           418        0    3,106       0    1,116      —  ——–           —      —    —–     —    —–       2  California     124,275        0   84,211       0   45,419       –  ———-     ——-      —   ——     —   ——       9  Colorado            41        0   10,938       0    3,618       –  ——–           —      —   ——     —    —–      33  Connecticut          0    2,100        0     312      616      —  ———–        —    —–      —     —      —      32  Delaware             0        0        0     609      244      —  ——–           —      —      —     —      —          District           of           Columbia          365        0      452       0      174          ———–        —      —      —     —      —       3  Florida              0  101,602        0  37,664   18,777       –  ——-            —  ——-      —  ——   ——       7  Georgia              2        0   22,057       0    9,233       –  ——-            —      —   ——     —    —–      15  Hawaii             535        0    1,380       0      211      —  ——             —      —    —–     —      —       6  Idaho            2,433        0    2,552       0      115       –  —–            —–      —    —–     —      —      10  Illinois             0   11,807        0  12,130    8,849      —  ——–           —   ——      —  ——    —–      13  Indiana              0    4,767        1   5,697    3,404      —  ——-            —    —–      —   —–    —–      41  Iowa                 0        0      701       0      955      —  —-               —      —      —     —      —      35  Kansas               0      480        0   1,238      717      —  ——             —      —      —   —–      —      40  Kentucky             0      976        0   1,179      689      —  ——–           —      —      —   —–      —      38  Louisiana            0      134        0   2,498      654      —  ———          —      —      —   —–      —      42  Maine                0      263        0     500       66      —  —–              —      —      —     —       —      17  Maryland             0    6,543        0   1,101    1,676      —  ——–           —    —–      —   —–    —–      19  Massachusetts        0    7,178        0   1,994    1,606      —  ————-      —    —–      —   —–    —–       8  Michigan             0        0   19,444       0   14,369       –  ——–           —      —   ——     —   ——      18  Minnesota           63        0    5,342       0    3,729      —  ———          —      —    —–     —    —–      43  Mississippi          0        0    1,131       0      344      —  ————-      —      —    —–     —      —      29  Missouri             3        0    4,107       0    3,180      —  ——–           —      —    —–     —    —–      48  Montana              0        0       15       0      136      —  ——-            —      —      —     —      —      45  Nebraska             0      376        0       7       35      —  ——–           —      —      —     —       —       1  Nevada          21,713        0   12,963       0    9,019       –  ——          ——      —   ——     —    —–      25  New Hampshire        0        0    1,607       0      441      —  ————-      —      —    —–     —      —      24  New Jersey           0    7,660        0   3,202    1,662      —  ————-      —    —–      —   —–    —–      31  New Mexico           0    1,038        0     670      291      —  ————-      —    —–      —     —      —      39  New York             0   10,082        0   2,181    1,401      —  ——–           —   ——      —   —–    —–      37  North Carolina   1,257        0    3,263       0    3,099      —  ————-    —–      —    —–     —    —–      49  North Dakota         0        1        0      48       39      —  ————-      —      —      —     —      —      11  Ohio                 0   12,000        0  10,163    8,954      —  —-               —   ——      —  ——    —–      36  Oklahoma           936        0    1,487       0      633      —  ——–           —      —    —–     —      —      12  Oregon             221        0    7,225       0    2,189      —  ——             —      —    —–     —    —–      30  Pennsylvania         0    5,341        0   4,900    2,979      —  ————-      —    —–      —   —–    —–      22  Rhode Island        13        0      420       0    1,226      —  ————-      —      —      —     —    —–      26  South Carolina       0    3,970        0     999    1,830      —  ————-      —    —–      —     —    —–      46  South Dakota         0       81        0      74        5      —  ————-      —      —      —     —      —      21  Tennessee            0        0    6,090       0    4,387      —  ———          —      —    —–     —    —–      28  Texas               39        0   15,541       0   11,236      —  —–              —      —   ——     —   ——       5  Utah             3,041        0    3,252       0    2,143       –  —-             —–      —    —–     —    —–      50  Vermont              0        0        1       0       13      —  ——-            —      —     —      —      —      14  Virginia            13        0   10,917       0    4,487      —  ——–           —      —   ——     —    —–      16  Washington           0        0    8,013       0    3,181      —  ————-      —      —    —–     —    —–      47  West Virginia        0        0      311       0       30      —  ————-      —      —      —     —      —      20  Wisconsin            0    5,323        0   2,451    2,284      —  ———          —    —–      —   —–    —–      44  Wyoming              1        0      138       0       89      —  ——-            —      —      —     —      —           U.S.                  336,173       380     4.57    33.21      —  —-                  ——-       —     —-    —–                           Properties with Foreclosure Filings                           ———————————–                                                     % Change  % Change    Rate     State                           1/every    from     from    Rank     Name                 Total   X HU (rate)  Q1 09     Q2 08    —-     —–                —–   ———– ——-   ——-last_img read more

The top 10 marketing & tech trends that tickled our fancy in 2014!

first_img continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Welcome to part four in our Top Marketing and Tech Trends of 2014! Today, we take a closer look at financial institutions; specifically, how the next current generation of Millennials are influencing the banking and credit union industry.5. Millennials and Financial InstitutionsResearch in 2014 would suggest, quite frankly, that Millennials hate banks. Well, maybe “hate” is a strong word, but millennials are increasingly viewing these financial institutions as archaic.How Millennials are Disrupting the Traditional Banking SystemWhy is this? Are Millennials just disinterested in their financial futures? Millennials are stereotypically described as the “boomerang generation” or the Peter Pan generation for their perceived tendencies for delaying certain rites of passage into adulthood. It’s true; the statistic most commonly referenced to prove this point is Millennials are living at home with their parents longer in comparison with past generations.Does this mean, then, that Millennials possess a lack of responsibility, a disinterest in all things “adult”? A survey conducted by Merrill Lynch in 2014 says not necessarily. The survey reveals that “by and large, the Millennials in our survey don’t come across as entitled, disengaged from the real world or enthralled by instant gratification, and they aren’t upending their parents’ approach to investing. Instead, the data portray a group who are oriented toward the future, who have a strong sense of familial and social responsibility.”last_img read more

Canada completes investigation of sixth BSE case

first_img Aug 9 FDA enforcement report that lists animal feed recall Canada reported two BSE cases in July. The CFIA said it expects that a report on the investigation of the seventh case, a 50-month-old cow from Alberta, will be finalized in a few days. That case raised concerns in Canada and the United States because it was born after 1997 when Canada banned the use of cattle protein in feed for cattle and other ruminants. Meanwhile, in the United States the US Food and Drug Administration announced two animal feed recalls on Aug 2 because both products were suspected of being contaminated with ruminant protein or bone meal. On Jun 26, Canada announced that it has toughened its feed ban by prohibiting cattle parts from all animal feeds, pet foods, and fertilizers, making Canada’s restrictions tighter than those in the United States. The CFIA reviewed the feed and management practices on the farm where the animal lived and determined that the farm’s cattle had access only to feed products that were appropriate for cattle. Investigators traced 21 herd mates that had been purchased with the animal; one was still alive and tested negative for BSE. Investigators suspect the cow was exposed in 1989 or 1990 when the cow was very young and when meat and bone additives in cattle feed were accepted and legal. Cattle are most susceptible to BSE infection during their first year,. The disease was detected through Canada’s ongoing BSE surveillance program. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), in an Aug 8 announcement on the investigation, said that the advanced age of the cow, believed to be at least 16 years, limited the CFIA’s ability to collect information about the animal’s early health history, including its birth farm.center_img The carcass and hide from the infected cow, along with other contaminated materials, were placed under control and deep buried according to provincial environmental regulations, the CFIA report said. No part of the animal’s carcass entered the human food or animal feed systems. One recall affected about 27 million pounds of dairy feed made between February 2005 and Jun 16 by Gagetown, Mich.–based Vita Plus Corporation for distribution in Michigan. The recall involves an undetermined amount of a custom animal feed made by Burkmann Feeds, LLC, based in Glasgow, Ky. for distribution in Kentucky. The feed contains an ingredient called Pro-Lak that may include ruminant meat or bone meal. Two female calves born to the cow—one in 2004 and one in 2005—that investigators attempted to trace were presumed dead. Neither was registered by birth date in the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency database, which some countries require for export. Aug 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Canadian authorities have concluded their investigation of the sixth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), confirmed on Jul 3 in a cow from Manitoba. Aug 8 CFIA complete investigative report on sixth BSE case See also:last_img read more

Dutch PM says his attitude to ‘Black Pete’ winter tradition has undergone ‘great changes’

first_img Topics : Rutte observed that the tradition is already changing. Some local celebrations feature Black Petes with dabs of paint on their cheeks, representing soot from the chimneys he is said to climb down to deliver presents. Others include multicolored Petes, dropping the word “Black” from the name.Anti-racism protests honoring George Floyd were held in Amsterdam and Rotterdam this week, with more scheduled. . Rutte acknowledged at a press conference on Wednesday that discrimination is a “systematic problem” in the Netherlands.”Here too, people are judged by their heritage,” he said.The protests were triggered by death of Floyd, an unarmed black man, while in the custody of white police officers in Minneapolis. Rutte said that since 2013 he had met many people, including “small children, who said ‘I feel terribly discriminated [against] because Pete is black’.””And I thought, that’s the last thing that we want” in a holiday intended for children.”I expect in a few years there will be no more Black Petes,” Rutte said.While critics including UN cultural experts have said Black Pete is offensive, a shrinking majority of white Dutch people argue Pete is either a magical fantasy figure not portraying any race or a lively figure of fun.center_img Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said his attitude towards “Black Pete”, a figure from the country’s winter holiday celebrations that has been criticized as a racist caricature, had undergone “great changes” in recent years.In a debate in parliament over anti-racism protests in the Netherlands prompted by solidarity with US demonstrations, Rutte said late on Thursday his view had changed since 2013, when he said “Black Pete is just black and I can’t do much about that” and dismissed the discussion.In the Dutch tradition, St. Nicholas brings gifts to kids accompanied by numerous “Petes”, clownish servants usually portrayed by white people in black face paint wearing frizzy wigs and red lipstick.last_img read more

Dodgers reach deal to get 2B Chase Utley

first_imgThe Pasadena native has 1,623 hits in 13 seasons, all with the Phillies, in addition to the World Series ring that he won in 2008. Only 41 second basemen have played more games in major league history than Utley (1,453).Dodgers shortstop Jimmy Rollins, who played with Utley in Philadelphia from 2003-14, said he reached out to his former teammate after hearing trade rumors Wednesday. He hinted that the two have talked about a reunion in Los Angeles before.“More than anything, there will be some new excitement in the clubhouse,” Rollins said. “(Utley) has a chance to play some meaningful baseball late in the year again. That’s what we all want.”The Dodgers gave up Triple-A utilityman Darnell Sweeney and Single-A pitcher John Richy to get Utley. The Phillies also gave up some cash, enough that the Dodgers will pay only about $2 million of Utley’s salary. On the surface, Utley would appear to strictly be a rental player for the Dodgers’ playoff push. He has a club option for 2016 valued up to $11 million, or a $2 million buyout. OAKLAND >> The wake left by the Dodgers’ August 2012 trade for Adrian Gonzalez and Carl Crawford is still rippling through Chavez Ravine. Three years from now, the same will not be said about Wednesday’s trade for Philadelphia Phillies second baseman Chase Utley.This trade at least had something the Dodgers’ last August blockbuster did not, a player once considered a generational talent at his position. If and when Utley has a plaque in Cooperstown, N.Y., it will list his time as a Dodger. That’s expected to begin Friday in Houston.“When he’s healthy,” Dodgers general manager Farhan Zaidi said of Utley, “he’s still one of the best hitters in the game.”Utley is as healthy now as he’s been all season. Since Aug. 7, when he returned from a bout of inflammation in his right ankle, Utley has hit safely in eight straight games (15 for 31) with five doubles and a home run. Zaidi said that Utley will be the Dodgers’ primary second baseman until Howie Kendrick returns from his strained left hamstring in September. “He worked out a little at third base for the Phillies,” Zaidi said. “We might try to get him more at those other spots.”Fill-in Kiké Hernandez, who bats right-handed, has crushed left-handed pitching this season and struggled against righties. Utley, who bats left-handed, has an .860 on-base plus slugging percentage in his career against righties.Acquiring Utley gives the Dodgers the option of moving Hernandez to center field in a platoon with Joc Pederson. Pederson has struggled to hit left-handed pitching in his rookie season, and the Dodgers don’t trust anyone other than he or Hernandez in center field defensively.Switch-hitting third baseman Alberto Callaspo was designated for assignment. Callaspo hit .262 with a .338 on-base percentage in 59 games with the Dodgers.A fleet-footed utilityman, Sweeney was hitting .271 with nine homers, 30 doubles, 32 stolen bases and 49 RBI in 116 games this year for Triple-A Oklahoma City.Richy, the Dodgers’ third-round draft selection out of UNLV in 2014, was 10-5 with a 4.20 ERA in 22 games (18 starts) for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga this season.Utley, 36, grew up in Long Beach and starred at Long Beach Poly and UCLA. He was the 15th overall pick in the 2000 draft. As a player with 10 years in the league and the last five with one team, Utley had the right to veto any trade.Rollins believes his former teammate made a good choice.“I think it’ll be a lot of fun,” Rollins said. “One, (the Dodgers) were his team (growing up). Went to school over at UCLA. Plays well at Dodger Stadium — actually he beats up the Dodgers wearing a Phillies uniform.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Silver Tee award for Georgia Hall

first_img18 Feb 2013 Silver Tee award for Georgia Hall Dorset teenager Georgia Hall has won the England Golf Silver Tee award for the way she combines her education with her top class golf career. Georgia, 16, is both Europe’s number one woman amateur golfer and a student at the LeAF Elite Athlete Academy in Bournemouth, where she is taking a BTEC National Diploma in Sport. “I was very, very pleased to get the award because I do try to do my best at school,” said Georgia, who is a member at Remedy Oak. The award was announced at the annual general meeting of England Golf. The BTEC suits her ideally: it’s coursework based and offers her the flexibility to study around her international golfing commitments, and she can relate her studies to her own sporting experience. “Golf comes first, but I want to keep my education going if I can,” said Georgia. “School is really, really good, they support my golf and always want to know how I’m getting on.”   There’s a lot to relay. Georgia is the British girls’ champion and she’s the fifth ranked woman amateur in the world. Already this season the England international has made history by winning two gold medals at the Australian Youth Olympic Festival and she’s been invited to play in the first women’s Major of the season, the Kraft Nabisco Championship in California in April. She’s currently in Spain on warm weather training with England Golf and will go on to compete in the Spanish women’s amateur championship. Image of Georgia Hall © Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more