Dengue claims one more life in Pune

first_imgChandrika Ghosh, a resident of Balaji Nagar in Akurdi, died of dengue on Sunday. Ghosh, who was in her early twenties, was admitted to Yashwantrao Chavan Memorial Hospital in Pimpri last Friday after she complained of severe body ache. She had high fever and recurrent bouts of nausea, said doctors. Ghosh tested positive for the NS 1 antigen and died at 3:30 a.m. The Health Department of the Pune Municipal Corporation has recorded 380 cases since January. More than 200 cases have been recorded in July alone with 90 testing positive for dengue. Pune claims a large share of the 470-odd cases of suspected dengue recorded across Maharashtra.Rain aids spread The incessant rain over the past three weeks has led to the spread of dengue, say health experts. Last week, a 32-year-old woman doctor who had just given birth died due to multi-organ failure following dengue fever in the city’s Sahyadri Hospital in Hadapsar. The case drew the attention of the State Health Department which accused the hospital of facilitating the breeding of dengue-transmitting Aedes mosquitoes on its premises. It directed PMC to take action against the hospital and rapped the civic authorities for poor health surveillance. On July 19, a 40-year-old man from Satara district who was undergoing treatment at a city hospital succumbed to a viral co-infection brought on by dengue and swine flu. In February, a minor died in the city’s Karve Nagar area. Notices issuedThe PMC has sent notices to 12 police stations in areas where rivulets of stagnant water have been spotted. The civic body has also issued notices to 11,000 public and private spaces and establishments.last_img read more

Dravid falls prey to debatable umpiring on the current England tour

first_imgRahul Dravid continues to be at the receiving end of controvesial decisions by the  umpires on the current England tour as he was ruled out caught behind on Saturday, despite ‘Hot Spot’ not detecting an edge off his bat. For the third time in this tour that Dravid has fallen to a debatable decision as he was given out twice in the preceding Test series in controversial fashion. However, snicko-meter, which is not part of the UDRS, later suggested that there was a contact between the ball and the bat. Saturday’s decision yet again brought technological shortcomings to the fore under the UDRS system. England paceman Stuart Broad appealed for a catch behind the wicket off his own bowling in the fourth ball of the 18th over but umpire Billy Doctrove ruled not out.Broad opted for a review straight away.Third umpire Marais Erasmus from South Africa took help of ‘Hot Spot’ but even after several replays, the edge could not be established, though a sound was definitely detected.However, much to the astonishment of the fans and the batsman, Erasmus ruled Dravid out. In the third Test, Dravid was ruled caught behind off James Anderson in India’s second innings when his bat actually had hit the shoelace and he hadn’t edged the ball. Then in the fourth Test, he was given out caught behind in India’s second innings. Dravid was ruled not out by the umpire but given out for 13 after referral by England though the snicko-meter apparently showed that there was no contact between the ball and the bat before it landed into home side wicketkeeper Matt Prior’s gloves. Debates and discussions have already started on the decision. Cricketer Aakash Chopra tweeted, “The most reliable tool for DRS is proving the least trustworthy. But I’m more baffled by the quality of umpiring.” “How can d third umpire overturn the on-field umpire’s decision without conclusive evidence to suggest d opposite,” he added.advertisementlast_img read more