Cape Town bar on world top 20 list

first_img29 June 2012Tjing Tjing Rooftop Bar in Cape Town came in fourth on Conde Nast Traveler’s list of “Best New Bars in 20 Cities” worldwide, it was announced in the international magazine’s July issue.The list profiles the best new drinking and dancing hotspots in the world.Tjing Tjing, located in a 181-year-old heritage building in Longmarket Street in the Cape Town city centre, claimed its spot on the list for its atmosphere, music and choice of food and wine.“Enveloped in the wooden mansards of the old attic is an eclectic mix of new and old, local and Asian, with a Japanese shrine-inspired red bar and black and white Tokyo imagery,” says tjingtjing.co.za. “The bar opens up to a lofty outside terrace.”The bar is well known for its music, playing a mixture of electronic and indie music, drawing a hip clientele that ranges from journalists to graphic designers.Tjing Tjing serves a variety of interestingly named cocktails, such as the Ginger Ninja and Asian Persuasion, and has an extensive wine list.There are wine tastings with the bar’s wine suppliers every Wednesday between 5pm and 7pm, with no charge and no bookings necessary.Their food also holds its own. “Our tapas menu boasts sticky Asian-glazed pork belly skewers as a favourite, cheese & charcuterie boards and springrolls,” the Tjing Tjing website says.The bar is located on 165 Longmarket Street.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Honeybees pick up “astonishing” number of agricultural, urban pesticides via non-crop plants

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A Purdue University study shows that honeybees collect the vast majority of their pollen from plants other than crops, even in areas dominated by corn and soybeans, and that pollen is consistently contaminated with a host of agricultural and urban pesticides throughout the growing season.Christian Krupke, professor of entomology, and then-postdoctoral researcher Elizabeth Long collected pollen from Indiana honeybee hives at three sites over 16 weeks to learn which pollen sources honeybees use throughout the season and whether they are contaminated with pesticides.The pollen samples represented up to 30 plant families and contained residues from pesticides spanning nine chemical classes, including neonicotinoids — common corn and soybean seed treatments that are toxic to bees. The highest concentrations of pesticides in bee pollen, however, were pyrethroids, insecticides typically used to control mosquitoes and other nuisance pests.“Although crop pollen was only a minor part of what they collected, bees in our study were exposed to a far wider range of chemicals than we expected,” Krupke said. “The sheer numbers of pesticides we found in pollen samples were astonishing. Agricultural chemicals are only part of the problem. Homeowners and urban landscapes are big contributors, even when hives are directly adjacent to crop fields.”Long, now an assistant professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, said she was also “surprised and concerned” by the diversity of pesticides found in pollen.“If you care about bees as a homeowner, only use insecticides when you really need to because bees will come into contact with them,” she said.The study suggests that overall levels of pesticide exposure for honeybees in the Corn Belt could be considerably higher than previously thought, Krupke said. This is partly because research efforts and media attention have emphasized neonicotinoids’ harmful effects on pollinators and their ability to travel and persist in the environment. Few studies, however, have examined how non-crop plants could expose bees to other classes of pesticides. Looking at Midwestern honeybees’ environment through this wider lens and over an entire season could provide more accurate insights into what bees encounter as they forage, Krupke said.Krupke and Long collected pollen weekly from May to September from hives placed in a non-agricultural meadow, the border of a cornfield planted with neonicotinoid-treated seeds and the border of a cornfield planted with non-treated seeds. They waited to begin their collection until after growers had planted their crops to avoid the heavily contaminated dust that arises during the planting of neonicotinoid-coated seeds.The samples showed that honeybees collect the overwhelming majority of their pollen from uncultivated plants, particularly the plant family that includes clover and alfalfa.The researchers found 29 pesticides in pollen from the meadow site, 29 pesticides in pollen from the treated cornfield and 31 pesticides in pollen from the untreated cornfield.“These findings really illustrate how honeybees are chronically exposed to numerous pesticides throughout the season, making pesticides an important long-term stress factor for bees,” Long said.The most common chemical products found in pollen from each site were fungicides and herbicides, typical crop disease and weed management products.Of the insecticides, neonicotinoids and pyrethroids were the most common in the pollen samples and pose the highest risks to bees, Krupke said. While both are toxic to bees, they differ in their relative risk levels. Neonicotinoids are more poisonous to bees but are primarily used on agricultural land. Conversely, pyrethroids are typically used where pollinators are likely to be — near homes and gardens with a diversity of flowering plants — potentially exposing bees to higher levels of chemicals and on a more frequent basis. The study showed distinct spikes of pyrethroids in August and September, months when many homeowners spray these chemicals to knock out mosquitoes, hornets and other nuisance pests. Pollen from all three sites also contained DEET, the active ingredient in most insect repellants.Krupke said that little is known about how these diverse pesticides interact with one another to affect bees. The toxicity of insecticides, for example, can increase when combined with certain fungicides, themselves harmless to insects.The researchers did not assess colony health in this study.The study was published in Nature Communications on May 31 and is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11629.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s North Central Regional Integrated Pest Management Program funded the research.last_img read more

In Lakhimpur, what’s Left is Right

first_imgCPI(M) candidate Amiya Kumar Handique, 65, received only 2.05% of the votes in the 2016 by-election to the Lakhimpur Lok Sabha constituency. Pradan Baruah of the BJP won the bypoll after Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal had vacated the seat.The CPI(M) has fielded Mr. Handique again, hoping the Leftist past of the constituency — its eastern half in particular — would catch up with the Rightist present. This half comprising Dhemaji district is almost always the worst hit by annual floods in Assam.Former ULFA bastionThe rest of the constituency is divided among Lakhimpur district, “island” district Majuli, and a part of Tinsukia district that houses Jerai Chokolibhoria, the village of the outlawed United Liberation Front of Asom’s military chief Paresh Baruah as well as the outfit’s general secretary Anup Chetia.Much of the areas under Lakhimpur constituency sustained the Maoism-inspired ULFA for a long time. The constituency was also responsible for its slide, beginning with the killing of rural development activist Sanjoy Ghose in Majuli in July 1997. The outfit still enjoyed local support until it set off a bomb in Dhemaji town and killed 13 people, including 10 schoolchildren, during the Independence Day function in 2004.The initial resistance to the ULFA, though, was from the United Reservation Movement Council of Assam in the late 1980s. Backed by the CPI(ML), it was led by Ranoj Pegu, a doctor who later formed the Ganashakti party before becoming a BJP legislator two years ago.Several other leaders with a communist past joined the BJP over the last three years.“Communication problems and farm losses due to floods were the main reasons why communism flourished in these parts,” said Manoj Pegu, a tea planter whose shopping complex in Dhemaji town is named after his son Lenin.The BJP has been showcasing two bridges — the 9.76 km Dhola-Sadiya, India’s longest, and the 4.94 km Bogibeel, India’s longest rail-road bridge — completed during “Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s tenure” as an example of connecting remote, backward parts of the constituency to the country’s development grid. The two bridges are located within the constituency.Claims, counter-claims“Much of these projects were completed during the Congress tenure,” Anil Borgohain, Lakhimpur’s Congress candidate said, accusing the BJP and its right-wing affiliates of intimidating and attacking him and party workers during the campaign that ended on Tuesday.The BJP’s sitting MP is confident of retaining his seat because of the party’s focus on improved communication. “We have also been addressing the issue of floods,” said Mr. Pradan Baruah.But at Dighiri Chapori, barely 10 km east of Dhemaji town, the likes of 49-year-old farmer Jarman Doley know it would take a lot more than promises to undo the damage done by the Jiadhol, a tributary of the Brahmaputra. Sand deposited by the river over the years has buried paddy fields and houses in six villages in the area. The sand-induced barrenness led to Dighiri Chapori and several other patches in the district.“About 100 of some 240 families have built new chang-ghars (houses on stilts) that are 20-25 ft above the original level. This happened in the last three years. The BJP has promised the rest of us more houses as well as roads,” he said.The other candidates — 11 apart from the BJP’s — too have assured a solution to their perennial problem. They include Hem Kanta Miri of Socialist Unity Centre of India (Communist) and Arup Kalita of CPI, underlining the Left Front’s bid to regain lost ground.last_img read more