Santa Clarita Calendar

first_img Classics Book Club will meet, 10:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 23630 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 254-6604. Reptile Club for ages 7-12 will meet, 1-2 p.m. and for ages 13-17 will meet, 2-3 p.m. at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-7721. Santa Clarita Runners Club will meet for marathon training, 6:30 a.m. in the parking lot at Granary Square, 25930 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org. Bingo will be played, 10:30 a.m. at Mint Canyon Moose Lodge, 18000 W. Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-7222. Saugus train station will be open, 1-4 p.m. at Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park, 24151 Newhall Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 254-1275. Music jam session, 2 p.m. at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6885, 16208 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Local musicians welcome. Call (661) 252-6885. MONDAY Special Olympics offers golf lessons to athletes with learning disabilities, evenings at Vista Valencia Golf Course, 24700 W. Trevino Drive, Valencia. New athletes or volunteer coaches can call (661) 253-2121. TUESDAY Santa Clarita Republican Women will meet, 10 a.m. at Republican Headquarters, 24267 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-3422. Teen Writing Workshop, 6 p.m. at Barnes & Noble, 23630 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 254-6604. Nonaerobic workout in a heated pool for joint and muscle conditioning, 10:30 a.m. at the Santa Clarita Valley Family YMCA, 26147 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-3593. Santa Clarita Runners Club will work out, 6:15 p.m. at the College of the Canyons track, 26455 N. Rockwell Road, Valencia. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org. Sierra Hillbillies Square Dance Club will offer an intermediate class, 7-9 p.m. in rooms A1 and 2 at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Call (661) 252-2210 or (661) 255-0463. Barbershop Harmony Singers will rehearse, 7:30-10 p.m. in the multipurpose room at Valley Oaks Village Apartments, 24700 Valley St., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6109 for security-door information. WEDNESDAY Mobile Solutions Van from the Braille Institute will be available for the visually impaired, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Call John Taylor at (661) 259-9444, Ext. 125. AHA! (Artists Helping Artists) will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Barnes & Noble, 23630 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call Trish Lester at (661) 254-1242 or e-mail AHA@Trish Lester.com. Santa Clarita Sunrise Rotary Club will meet, 7:10 a.m. at IHOP, 24737 W. Pico Canyon Road, Stevenson Ranch. Call (661) 250-1023. Santa Clarita Valley Rotary Club will meet, 12:10 p.m. at Marie Callender’s, 27630 The Old Road, Valencia. Call (661) 259-7701. Santa Clarita Valley-Newhall Optimist Club will meet, 7 p.m. at La Rumba, 27600 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 252-7313. Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at the Sierra Hills clubhouse, 28616 Kenroy Ave., Canyon Country. Call Desiree Nascimento at (800) 858-4749, Ext. 114. Valencia Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. Call Kim Dickens at (661) 259-8567 or visit www.valenciatoastmasters.org for location. Basic & Advanced Coastal Navigation class, 7-9 p.m. at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, 23233 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 298-8725 or (661) 259-7201. SCV Underwater Hockey group will play, 8-9 p.m. at the Santa Clarita Aquatics Center, 20850 Centre Pointe Parkway, Canyon Country. Cost: $3. Call Ben Jarvis at (661) 510-2665. Special Olympics offers athletic training and competition for athletes with learning disabilities during the evenings at various locations in Santa Clarita. New athletes or volunteer coaches can call (661) 253-2121. THURSDAY Nonaerobic workout in a heated pool for joint and muscle conditioning, 10:30 a.m. at the Santa Clarita Valley Family YMCA, 26147 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-3593. Santa Clarita Noon Kiwanis Club will meet, noon-1:30 p.m. at El Torito, 27510 The Old Road, Valencia. Call Janie Choate at (661) 296-8260. Youth Chess Club will meet, 5:30-8 p.m. at 25864-G Tournament Road, Valencia. Call Jay Stallings at (661) 288-1705. Evening Kiwanis Club will meet, 6:15 p.m. at Mulligan’s, 25848 Tournament Road, Valencia. Call Amy Spencer at (661) 255-6714. Santa Clarita Runners Club will meet for tempo runs, 6:15 p.m. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org for location. To submit an event for the Daily News calendar, contact Sharon Cotal two weeks prior to the event at (661) 257-5256, fax her at (661) 257-5262, e-mail her at sharon.cotal@dailynews.com or write to her at 24800 Avenue Rockefeller, Valencia, CA 91355. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake Saugus train station will be open, 1-4 p.m. at Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park, 24151 Newhall Ave. Call (661) 254-1275. Animal show, 1 p.m. at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Free. Call (661) 259-7721. Karaoke night, 8 o’clock at VFW Post 6885, 16208 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-6885. Special Olympics offers athletic training and competition for athletes with learning disabilities throughout the day at various locations in Santa Clarita. New athletes or volunteer coaches can call (661) 253-2121. SUNDAY TODAY Karaoke night, 6:30-9:30 at Vincenzo’s, 24504 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6733. SATURDAY Newhall Branch of the Italian Catholic Federation will meet for dinner and socializing, 6:30 p.m. at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 23233 W. Lyons Ave., Newhall. Cost: $5. Call Lorraine at (661) 284-1923. Santa Clarita Runners Club will meet for a morning run, 7 o’clock in the parking lot at Starbucks, 26415 Bouquet Canyon Road, Valencia. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org. Free wellness workshop will present research about stubborn weight, fatigue and hormone imbalance, 10-11:30 a.m. at the office of Dr. Larry Cart, 24868 Apple St., Suite 101, Newhall. Call (661) 284-6233. last_img read more

Leaky Fat Blobs Produced Life

first_img“How life began remains an open question,” said David Deamer in Nature,1 then filled the opening with a speculation: maybe life started in leaky blobs of fat.    The imaginary first primitive cells would have had a problem.  Without transport proteins that control entrances and exits, any lucky ingredients that might have come together inside a primitive membrane might leak out.  But if the membrane was too protective, the inside molecules would be trapped.  “A model of a primitive cell suggests that early membranes were surprisingly permeable,” the article subtitle teased.  Indeed, a team writing in the same issue published results of their laboratory simulations of an artificial vesicle that “allows small, organic ‘nutrient’ molecules to pass through its membrane.”  Would that solve the problems?    Deamer switched imaginary views to a primitive earth with volcanoes popping out like acne.  The“local conditions were far from equilibrium – a constant flux of energy drove organic reactions towards ever-increasing complexity,” he imagined.  “This would ultimately have yielded various polymeric products, perhaps including prototypes of nucleic acids or proteins.”  Next, he envisioned “vast numbers of microscopic assemblies of molecules” that became enclosed in fatty bubbles.  By chance, life emerged:In this theory of the origins of life, each cell-like assembly had a different composition from the next.  Most were inert, but a few might have contained a particular mixture of components that could be driven towards further complexity by capturing energy and small ‘nutrient’ molecules from the environment – the beginnings of a heterotrophic system.  As the nutrient molecules were transported into the internal compartment, they became linked together into long chains in an energy-consuming process.  Life began when one or more of the assemblies found a way not only to grow, but also to reproduce by incorporating a cycle involving catalytic functions and genetic information.The leaps in that scenario are astonishing, but finally Deamer acknowledged a problem: “the membrane that forms the compartment of the putative cell is also a permeability barrier.”  How to get nutrients inside for the catalytic cycle, assuming it got going?  He pointed to the work of Mansy et al in the same issue.2  They experimented with prefabricated vesicles that were able to selectively permit the passage of ribose or nucleotides but exclude polymers.  The researchers “establish for the first time that a simulated prebiotic protocell can work with an external source of reagents,” he said.  “a heterotrophic origin of primitive cellular life is feasible.”3    In his closing paragraph, Deamer took a swipe at the strong minority of origin-of-life researchers who believe life took hold in metabolic cycles before cells emerged: “Cells are the basic unit of all life today, and there is increasing reason to think that the first form of life was a primitive version of a cell, rather than a replicating molecule supported by a metabolic network.”1.  David Deamer, “Origins of life: How leaky were primitive cells?,” Nature 454, 37-38 (3 July 2008) | doi:10.1038/454037a.2.  Mansy et al, “Template-directed synthesis of a genetic polymer in a model protocell,” Nature 454, 122-125 (3 July 2008) | doi:10.1038/nature07018.3.  Heterotroph (other-nourished) means an organism that lives off the nutrient manufacture of others; i.e., humans are heterotrophs.  Autotrophs (self-nourished) organisms make their own food.  Because autotrophs, like plants, require much more complexity in order to harvest energy and make food, origin-of-life researchers have preferred to believe that the first life-forms were heterotrophs.  Though the complexity gets divided up somewhat, it begs the question of how heterotrophs obtained their required nutrients with no autotrophs around.More powerful than a loco motive, leaping tall conceptual hurdles with a single bound, faster than a speeding roulette, it’s Supermad!    For more cartoons, stay tuned to the Nature channel.  Now, for a word from our sponsors.  Do you sometimes feel like a fat blob?  Are you lacking energy and feeling lifeless?  Here’s a tip; jump into a volcano.  That’s right.  The far-from-equilibrium conditions at the Volcano Mountain Health Spa are sure to drive you toward higher degrees of complexity and fitness.  It will also improve your sex life.  You’ll find yourself growing and reproducing in no time.  Spend a few million years on our metabolic cycles and read our magazines, filled with genetic information.  Join today and get a free cart load of our sugary snacks made of 100% pure ribose, just in from Death Valley! (11/05/2004).    If you’re tired of cartoon re-runs (09/03/2004), get some realistic intellectual nourishment at Creation-Evolution Headlines.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Honeybees pick up “astonishing” number of agricultural, urban pesticides via non-crop plants

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A Purdue University study shows that honeybees collect the vast majority of their pollen from plants other than crops, even in areas dominated by corn and soybeans, and that pollen is consistently contaminated with a host of agricultural and urban pesticides throughout the growing season.Christian Krupke, professor of entomology, and then-postdoctoral researcher Elizabeth Long collected pollen from Indiana honeybee hives at three sites over 16 weeks to learn which pollen sources honeybees use throughout the season and whether they are contaminated with pesticides.The pollen samples represented up to 30 plant families and contained residues from pesticides spanning nine chemical classes, including neonicotinoids — common corn and soybean seed treatments that are toxic to bees. The highest concentrations of pesticides in bee pollen, however, were pyrethroids, insecticides typically used to control mosquitoes and other nuisance pests.“Although crop pollen was only a minor part of what they collected, bees in our study were exposed to a far wider range of chemicals than we expected,” Krupke said. “The sheer numbers of pesticides we found in pollen samples were astonishing. Agricultural chemicals are only part of the problem. Homeowners and urban landscapes are big contributors, even when hives are directly adjacent to crop fields.”Long, now an assistant professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, said she was also “surprised and concerned” by the diversity of pesticides found in pollen.“If you care about bees as a homeowner, only use insecticides when you really need to because bees will come into contact with them,” she said.The study suggests that overall levels of pesticide exposure for honeybees in the Corn Belt could be considerably higher than previously thought, Krupke said. This is partly because research efforts and media attention have emphasized neonicotinoids’ harmful effects on pollinators and their ability to travel and persist in the environment. Few studies, however, have examined how non-crop plants could expose bees to other classes of pesticides. Looking at Midwestern honeybees’ environment through this wider lens and over an entire season could provide more accurate insights into what bees encounter as they forage, Krupke said.Krupke and Long collected pollen weekly from May to September from hives placed in a non-agricultural meadow, the border of a cornfield planted with neonicotinoid-treated seeds and the border of a cornfield planted with non-treated seeds. They waited to begin their collection until after growers had planted their crops to avoid the heavily contaminated dust that arises during the planting of neonicotinoid-coated seeds.The samples showed that honeybees collect the overwhelming majority of their pollen from uncultivated plants, particularly the plant family that includes clover and alfalfa.The researchers found 29 pesticides in pollen from the meadow site, 29 pesticides in pollen from the treated cornfield and 31 pesticides in pollen from the untreated cornfield.“These findings really illustrate how honeybees are chronically exposed to numerous pesticides throughout the season, making pesticides an important long-term stress factor for bees,” Long said.The most common chemical products found in pollen from each site were fungicides and herbicides, typical crop disease and weed management products.Of the insecticides, neonicotinoids and pyrethroids were the most common in the pollen samples and pose the highest risks to bees, Krupke said. While both are toxic to bees, they differ in their relative risk levels. Neonicotinoids are more poisonous to bees but are primarily used on agricultural land. Conversely, pyrethroids are typically used where pollinators are likely to be — near homes and gardens with a diversity of flowering plants — potentially exposing bees to higher levels of chemicals and on a more frequent basis. The study showed distinct spikes of pyrethroids in August and September, months when many homeowners spray these chemicals to knock out mosquitoes, hornets and other nuisance pests. Pollen from all three sites also contained DEET, the active ingredient in most insect repellants.Krupke said that little is known about how these diverse pesticides interact with one another to affect bees. The toxicity of insecticides, for example, can increase when combined with certain fungicides, themselves harmless to insects.The researchers did not assess colony health in this study.The study was published in Nature Communications on May 31 and is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11629.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s North Central Regional Integrated Pest Management Program funded the research.last_img read more

Tips for Framing and Focus in Your Video Interview Setups

first_imgIn this write-up, we take a look at some of the decision-making that will go into the framing and focus of your video interview setups.If you work in the film and video industry long enough, you’re going to find yourself setting up for a video interview shoot sooner or later. (Heck, I probably shot ten video interviews during the first week of my internship after film school — it’s a huge part of the industry.)And while it may feel mundane at times, for a talented videographer or aspiring cinematographer, interview shoots can be great opportunities to really hone your craft, experiment with your cameras and gear, and build a solid reel and professional backbone for your career.Here, we’re going to discuss what to consider when setting up for your next video interview shoot.Decide on Camera SetupsImage by ponsulak.For many video interview shoots, you can probably get away with using just one camera — there are plenty of tricks you can use to make one camera look like two. And, of course, there are many added benefits of even using a third camera.But when diving into a video interview shoot, your first A-camera should always be your primary concern. It’s up to you to decide if you have enough time, resources, and/or help to properly make use of a second or third angle — as well as what you’d actually want from more coverage.Frame Your ShotYou’ll want to decide on how you’d like to frame up your shot, first and foremost. Ask yourself what the project might call for. Do you have a certain look or feeling that you’re going for? How much information do you want to capture to convey?Here are some tips for deciding between shooting a close-up, a medium shot, or a long shot.Cinematography Tip: How the Pros Frame a Close-UpHow to Frame a Medium Shot Like a Master CinematographerHow to Frame a Long Shot Like a Master Cinematographer Choose Your Focal LengthOnce you decide on your framing, you’ll want to decide on your focal length. Here’s a great article that helps explain focal length theory, as well as this article on how to apply it to your cinematography.Depending on what type of framing you’d like, you’ll want to adjust your focal length to match. A short focal length will have a wide field of view, while a long focal length will have a narrow field of view. When juxtaposed against how far away you are from your subject, you can adjust how you want your subject to appear in his or her space.From there, you’ll want to set your focus. Depending on your framing and focal length decisions, you can adjust your focus for depth of field. For example, a shallow depth of field will look more cinematic, and the background will be more blurry.Make Your Background InterestingA part of your focal length decision includes how to make your background interesting. If you’re shooting green screen, or against a white or black cyclorama wall, you don’t have to worry about it. But if you’re shooting interviews in a real setting, your background will be a huge part of what makes your shots interesting.If your depth of field is wide enough, try to follow some compositional best practices with the rule of thirds, as well as making the background appear organized and interesting — without drawing too much attention away from your subject.If your depth of field is super shallow, your background might be blurred out completely. You can adjust the light, color, and shapes behind your subject to make sure they are the main point of interest.Choose Your Angle“Production Tips for Lighting Your Next Interview Shoot“Many interview setups are often at a slight angle, instead of straight ahead. Unless your subject is reading from a teleprompter set up above or below your camera, you’re probably going to want to address them slightly from the side — anywhere from fifteen degrees to forty-five degrees is typically the norm for interview setups.Your goal is to show as much of the subject as possible, while still making them comfortable. If you’re shooting with a producer (or yourself) — talking directly to the subject — try standing just a few feet to the left or right of the camera and have your subject interact on that angle.Cover image by finchfocus.For more tips and tricks for shooting video interviews, check out these articles.Why (and How) You Should Take Notes During InterviewsInvisibility: The Secret to Editing and Shooting an Interview15 Tips for Shooting Dynamic Video InterviewsEverything You Need to Know to Shoot Professional Interviews5 Essential Tips for Editing Professional Interview Soundbiteslast_img read more

U.P. plans law against organised crime

first_imgThe Yogi Adityanath government on Wednesday gave its nod to a new law against organised crime in Uttar Pradesh along the lines of the stringent Maharashtra Control of Organised Crime Act (MCOCA). At a meeting presided by the Chief Minister, the State cabinet approved the Uttar Pradesh Control of Organised Crime Act, 2017.The BJP government is expected to introduce the proposed legislation in the Winter Session of the State Assembly, which commences from Thursday. The government said the UPCOCA was brought to check and curb acts of oganised crime and mafia, including land grabs, illegal mining, sale of illegal medicine and illicit liquor, wildlife smuggling, extortion, abduction syndicates as well as white-collared criminals. The draft of the proposed law, which could be tabled in the Assembly soon, was prepared in consultation with the State Law Department and after an “intensive study” of MCOCA, Cabinet Minister Shrikant Sharma said. A similar law was passed by the Uttar Pradesh government in 2007-08 when Mayawati was in power but it had to be withdrawn after then President Pratibha Patil refused to give it assent. Shrikant Sharma, U.P. Cabinet Minister, said it was the BJP government’s “priority” to make the State “free from injustice, crime and fear, and establish the rule of law.”Under the UPCOCA, the State would be empowered to seize the property of those implicated by the law during the period of investigation and properties acquired by people through illegal activities and organised crime would also be seized. State security would also be withdrawn from persons booked under the the law. Special courts would be set up for the trial of cases under UPCOCA for speedy conclusion. “Criminals will not be able to roam free for too long,” said Mr. Sharma.The government is introducing the UPCOCA when it already has a stringent law to check crime syndicates, the Gangsters Act. However, the UPCOCA would have 28 provisions in addition to the Gangsters Act.S.R Darapuri, retired IPS officer, was critical of the UPCOCA. He said the present laws were sufficient to deal with crimes in UP and there was no need for a special Act. Mr. Darapuri also said that the general experience was that “all such laws were misused against the weeker sections of the society,” in particular Dalits and Muslims.”These Special Acts do not help much in controlling crime. The need is for the existing laws to be implemented uniformly. There is a tendency to add more laws to cover up failure of the state in implementing existing laws,” Mr. Darapuri told The Hindu.last_img read more

Not satisfied

first_imgA new hope Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoenix Pulse rolled to the best start of its PBA life on Wednesday night, but coach Louie Alas wants his charges to drop all of their bad habits if they are to become a force later on in the Philippine Cup.“We again fell into our [bad habit] relying on our offensive firepower after we take big leads,” Alas said after the Fuel Masters plastered Columbian, 108-98, at Smart Araneta Coliseum for a 3-0 card that now stands as the new team mark. “It happened twice [in this game] and we failed to execute after that.”ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausscenter_img Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “We want to win because of our defense,” said Alas, who admitted to being the most surprised in the team over their 3-0 start, especially after going winless in three tune-up games and losing two of those by wide margins.Next up for the Fuel Masters is Blackwater, and Phoenix will have a 10-day break before that game, which Alas said they would use “to learn more things and correct their mistakes.”John Paul Calvo scored 18 points to lead the Dyip, who will next slug it out with red-hot NorthPort, which is on a 2-0 run and is also enjoying its finest all-Filipino start under Pido Jarencio.Later in the night, RR Pogoy dropped the biggest points in the stretch and saved TNT KaTropa from imploding, with an 85-80 nipping of NLEX giving the Texters their first win.Pogoy hit a triple with 43 seconds left for five-point lead and then sealed the deal with two free throws with 2.6 ticks to play as the Texters finally broke their silence while dealing the Road Warriors a third straight defeat.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Despite what Alas said, his Fuel Masters looked impressive in handling the Dyip and their super rookie CJ Perez, whom they held to just 10 points after he debuted with 26 in an upset 124-118 conquest of four-time defending champion San Miguel Beer.“We are still young, enjoying situations like that,” Alas continued in Filipino, referring to his wards holding a 19-point lead at one stage before allowing the Dyip to creep closer in the second half.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“We (coaching staff) need to instill it in the minds of the players” to keep playing hard even with a big lead, Alas said. “And we won’t tire reminding them (players) what to do.”Matthew Wright scattered 22 points, Calvin Abueva accounted for 16 and three others tossed in 12 or more for Alas. View commentslast_img read more