Women’s marchers exercising democracy

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRe Feb. 5 letter,  “Media must start providing quality”: I read the writer’s skewed YouTube view of the Woman’s March. I will tell you about my nine hours experience on the Mall and marching down Pennsylvania Avenue.All these “demented” marchers are your Ballston Spa neighbors. We are your nurses, waitresses, teachers, doctors and store clerks. We are grandmothers, mothers and daughters concerned about the chaos and hateful rhetoric of an inexperienced man occupying the most powerful office in the world.The people I marched with were polite, helpful, peaceful and totally committed to having a voice in our democracy. My favorite chant from that day is: “This is what democracy looks like.”This march inspired us. It cemented our determination. Many of us returned home and maintained active participation in our representative democracy. Ordinary women like me are calling Congress, showing up in congressional offices, writing these letters and, most importantly, voting.What is demented is the division constantly sowed by Donald Trump.Janet PalitschRexfordMore from The Daily Gazette:Police: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

PLN to receive Rp 9.6t from state coffers to build power infrastructure

first_img“We will use the funds as equity and reduce PLN loans,” PLN president director Zulkifli Zaini told House of Representatives lawmakers in Jakarta on Monday evening.His presentation and the regulations show that 86 percent of the capital is slated to develop transmission infrastructure, including high-voltage power lines and substations, all in western Indonesia except for several projects in Sulawesi.The country’s heavy investment in the infrastructure of electricity distribution is part of Indonesia’s efforts to achieve a 100 percent electrification ratio this year. The ratio – a measure of the proportion of communities with electricity – reached 98.89 percent last year.However, Zulkifli said the latest capital injection was insufficient to meet Indonesia’s power infrastructure targets. He said that meeting such targets would cost an estimated Rp 15.2 trillion, funds that the company has been raising through bank loans and global bonds. PLN slated 3 percent of the working capital injection to be used for electricity distribution infrastructure and 11 percent for renewable energy power plants in Sulawesi, Kalimantan, Aceh, Papua island and East Nusa Tenggara. The latter two are Indonesia’s most impoverished regions.“The [3 percent] capital is only for renewables. Not for fossil fuels,” added Zulkifli.Energy analyst Fabby Tumiwa said the use of renewable energy was cost-effective, as the state capital injections would be used to electrify 433 remote villages, most of which were located in West Papua and Papua.Many of the targeted villages in Papua are located in densely forested mountain areas.Read also: Indonesia to electrify 433 remote eastern villages“The most cost-effective solution to provide electricity there [in Papua and West Papua] is through the use of local energy, the renewable energy sources. An even better option is to distribute the plants’ electricity with a mini-grid or micro-grid,” he said.In electrifying the villages, PLN plans to expand electricity networks, build renewable energy power plants and distribute handheld ‘Talis’ battery packs. PLN estimates the electrification program would cost at least Rp 1.26 trillion.For PLN, expanding its electricity networks is also a strategy to weather a domestic electricity oversupply that strains the company’s cash flow due to the lower demand during the pandemic.The electricity giant is particularly focused on expanding its network to high industrial activity regions such as manufacturing-heartland Java and mineral-rich Sulawesi.PLN’s spending on privately owned power plants (IPPs) is projected to exceed its own fuel spending by 2021, due to the oversupply, warns a recent Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) study. IEEFA director Melissa Brown, who authored the study, said the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the financial problem as electricity domestic demand collapsed yet PLN remains obligated to buy a certain amount for electricity from IPPs.“The COVID-19 crisis has upended Indonesia’s financial settings and PLN’s dealings with the Indonesian public and global markets will need to be adjusted to face the new reality,” she said in a statement on April 7.PLN booked a net loss of Rp 38.9 trillion in this year’s first quarter, down from a net profit of Rp 4.12 trillion in the same period last year, after the rupiah exchange rate fell to a record low against the greenback in March.Topics : State-owned electricity giant PLN is slated to receive Rp 9.6 trillion (US$695 million) in state capital injections (PMN) from the government this year to develop power infrastructure in Indonesia and increase the country’s electrification ratio.The capital comprises Rp 5 trillion from the 2020 state budget and Rp 4.6 trillion diverted from the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry budget. PLN will use the capital to develop renewable energy power plants, power lines and substations.The funds allocation is stipulated in Government Regulation No. 37/2020 and No. 36/2020, both of which were issued on July 7.last_img read more