Kurtenbach: Three trades I’d like to see the 49ers make before the NFL trade deadline

first_imgI won’t lie — I didn’t see this happening.I thought the 49ers would be an interesting team, perhaps even a fringe playoff contender, but 7-0 and the class of the NFC? No, that’s unexpected.That’s not to say that it’s a mirage, though — these guys are the real deal with a defense that’s dominant and an offense is clicking on all cylinders.As a legitimate Super Bowl contender, San Francisco is in a position of power. And they should take full advantage of that ahead of Tuesday’s NFL trade …last_img read more

Your Internal Motors Can Run Nanotech

first_imgIn each cell in your body, and in that of every living thing, there exists a tiny motor named ATP synthase that Science News1 calls “the ultimate molecular machine.”  It converts electrical to chemical energy, writes Alexandra Goho, “with amazing efficiency.”  Now, Japanese have harnessed some of these motors (only 12 millionths of a millimeter high) to power artificial machines.  They attached hundreds of the motors to a glass surface and attached little magnetic beads to the rotor part.  With an electromagnet, they induced them to spin, and were able to make them rotate both clockwise and counterclockwise.1Alexandra Goho, “Nature’s tiniest rotor runs like clockwork,” Science News, Week of Feb. 7, 2004; Vol. 165, No. 6, p. 94; see also article by Jessica Gorman, “Nanotech Switch: Strategy controls minuscule motor,” Science News, Week of Nov. 9, 2002; Vol. 162, No. 19.Biochemists and nanotechnologists are rightly fascinated by these nanoscopic machines, but strangely silent about where they came from.  They want to know what they can do with them, but where did they come from?  They hope they can borrow them for all kinds of nanodevices, but where did they come from?    Suppose we were members of a Star Trek crew from a distant galaxy, and had just landed on Mars.  We find this little rover with solar panels and wheels and instruments, and all we can think about is how we can play with it.  Wouldn’t some sentient being on the crew be thinking, Where did it come from?Exercise: if aliens found Spirit or Opportunity on Mars, would they be justified in inferring intelligent design for its origin, even if they knew nothing about the designers?  Why or why not?  If scientists found an ATP synthase motor in the desert, but instead of being nanoscopic it was the size of a cement mixer, would they be justified in thinking it had evolved from the sand?  Support your answers.    We’ve had many previous headlines on ATP Synthase.  You can start at the 09/18/2003 article and work back through the links for more information.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Khulisa founder wins social award

first_imgTurning lives around Van Selm adds the SASE Pinnacle Award to a long list of accolades that she has received for her work at Khulisa – including being elected as an Ashoka Fellow, winning the Elizabeth Arden/Elle Magazine Visible Difference Award, winning the MIB Group Majuba Forest Entrepreneur of the Year Award and receiving nominations for Woman of the Year for four consecutive years. Van Selm’s early career was characterised by a series of jobs at which she turned her entrepreneurial spirit to creating new opportunities and developing her own skills. A self-proclaimed “graduate of the school of hard knocks”, she worked in sales, marketing and travel, often at companies that she started up herself. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material SASE defines social entrepreneurs as visionary individuals who are motivated to evoke social change in a sustainable way. Khulisa crime prevention initiative “Khulisa is faced with many obstacles, including government buy-in, money to cover the costs of expanding according to demand, communities that are angry, hopeless and sceptical of our processes, and a lack of capacity to satisfy the need for programme demand,” says Van Selm. SAinfo reporter 24 March 2009 Van Selm is a social entrepreneur in the truest sense of the term, showing how her drive, compassion and insight have come together to create Khulisa, an organisation that is making radical changes to the South African criminal justice landscape. It was launched as an interactive course at Leeuwkop Prison to help offenders to use a common storytelling language to restore a sense of morality and ultimately lead to rehabilitation. Twelve years on, Khulisa is a reflection of the woman at the helm, who has devoted her time and energy into the Section 21 (not for profit) company, as well as of the huge successes than can be realised when a vision is applied to those who need it most. The course was developed after she spent time travelling around the world with Credo Mutwa, the South African spiritual leader, who was researching the common thread in different cultures’ storytelling traditions. Social entrepreneurs “recognise the gaps in service delivery and are constantly innovating solutions to developmental changes, they are also seeking ways in which to make these projects viable and independent of donor funding,” the organisers said in a statement this week.center_img “I am surrounded by incredible staff, and invigorated by the success stories that emerge from our programmes,” she says. “I also have the support of a secretary who has been with my for over twenty years and my husband who is a business consultant by profession and brought financial acumen into my life.” Khulisa states as its mission, “to unlock the potential of both individuals and the larger society”. This is done through a series of programmes and interventions at prisons and with at-risk youth in communities to make restitution, restore personal pride, prevent recidivism and provide alternatives to gangs, drugs and crime. At the time, Van Selm’s intention was merely to create a practical outlet for the lessons she had learnt on her travels, but in the face of the instant positive feedback she received, and the overwhelming need for such interventions among South Africa’s marginalised prison population, the demand was created and Khulisa was born. Social entrepreneurs Khulisa is a non-governmental organisation dedicated to the prevention of crime and the rehabilitation of offenders in South Africa, and the provenance of the organisation is inextricably bound to Van Selm’s personal journey of discovery working with marginalised people in the country. “We have a recidivism rate of 80%. Unless we do something about providing second chances and alternative ways of living to people who have been in conflict with the law, crime will continue to perpetuate,” says Van Selm. “I am honoured to have received this award because I feel that it recognises and draws attention to the vital work that we at Khulisa are doing.” In 1997, armed only with her marketing expertise, experience in building companies for a new South Africa and a genuine belief in the importance of inter-cultural dialogue, Van Selm established the Khulisa crime prevention initiative. Aside from the obvious personal rewards that van Selm realises through helping people turn their lives around every day, she has been supported in her achievements by a number of factors. Unlocking potential Khulisa founder and MD Lesley-Ann van Selm was recognised for her crime prevention and offender rehabilitation initiatives with the Pinnacle Award at the Southern Africa Social Entrepreneurship (SASE) Awards in Johannesburg last week. But she feels that with young people at risk throughout the country, the work being done by Khulisa is so important that the challenges are worth facing and the battles worth fighting. The award is given to individuals who have developed and implemented innovative social ventures that have a transformative social impact, are driven by an operationally and financially sustainable model, and are replicable.last_img read more

Trump Administration announces relief for farmers hurt by trade war

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Since late May, soybean prices have dropped more than $2 per bushel as the trade war has escalated and tariffs have been implemented. Farm commodities across the board have been targeted and the farmers who produce those commodities are paying the price.The President has vowed for weeks that he would “take care” of farmers, but agriculture groups did not know until today what that help would look like. The plan outlined today by the Trump Administration includes three components: direct payments to farmers to mitigate lower prices resulting from retaliatory tariffs, direct commodity purchases by USDA, and funding for a temporary program similar in purpose to the current Market Access Program (MAP) and Foreign Market Development (FMD) programs. The cost of the package is expected to total around $12 billion spread across multiple commodities, which is in line with the estimated $11 billion impact of the unjustified retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural goods.President Trump directed U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue to craft a short-term relief strategy to protect agricultural producers while the Administration works on free, fair, and reciprocal trade deals to open more markets in the long run to help American farmers compete globally.  These programs will assist agricultural producers to meet the costs of disrupted markets.“This is a short-term solution to allow President Trump time to work on long-term trade deals to benefit agriculture and the entire U.S. economy,” Secretary Perdue said. “The President promised to have the back of every American farmer and rancher, and he knows the importance of keeping our rural economy strong. Unfortunately, America’s hard-working agricultural producers have been treated unfairly by China’s illegal trading practices and have taken a disproportionate hit when it comes illegal retaliatory tariffs. USDA will not stand by while our hard-working agricultural producers bear the brunt of unfriendly tariffs enacted by foreign nations. The programs we are announcing today help ensure our nation’s agriculture continues to feed the world and innovate to meet the demand.”Of the total unjustified retaliatory tariffs imposed on the United States, a disproportionate amount was targeted directly at American farmers. Trade damage from such retaliation has impacted a host of U.S. commodities, including field crops like soybeans and sorghum, livestock products like milk and pork, and many fruits, nuts, and other specialty crops. High tariffs disrupt normal marketing patterns, affecting prices and raising costs by forcing commodities to find new markets. Additionally, there is evidence that American goods shipped overseas are being slowed from reaching market by unusually strict or cumbersome entry procedures, which can affect the quality and marketability of perishable crops. This can boost marketing costs and discount our prices, and adversely affect our producers. USDA will use the following programs to assist farmers:The Market Facilitation Program, authorized under The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Charter Act and administered by Farm Service Agency (FSA), will provide payments incrementally to producers of soybeans, sorghum, corn, wheat, cotton, dairy, and hogs. This support will help farmers manage disrupted markets, deal with surplus commodities, and expand and develop new markets at home and abroad.Additionally, USDA will use CCC Charter Act and other authorities to implement a Food Purchase and Distribution Program through the Agricultural Marketing Service to purchase unexpected surplus of affected commodities such as fruits, nuts, rice, legumes, beef, pork and milk for distribution to food banks and other nutrition programs.Finally, the CCC will use its Charter Act authority for a Trade Promotion Program administered by the Foreign Agriculture Service (FAS) in conjunction with the private sector to assist in developing new export markets for our farm products.The National Pork Producers Council commends President Trump for taking steps to provide much-needed relief to American farmers in the crosshairs of global trade retaliation.“President Trump has said he has the back of U.S. farmers and today demonstrated this commitment with an aid package to sustain American agriculture cutoff from critical export markets as his administration works to realign U.S. global trade policy,” said Jim Heimerl, a pork producer from Johnstown, Ohio and president of the National Pork Producers Council. “U.S. pork, which began the year in expansion mode to capitalize on unprecedented global demand, now faces punitive tariffs on 40% of its exports. The restrictions we face in critical markets such as Mexico and China — our top two export markets by volume last year — have placed American pig farmers and their families in dire financial straits. We thank the president for taking immediate action.“While we recognize the complexities of resetting U.S. trade policy, we hope that U.S. pork will soon regain the chance to compete on a level playing field in markets around the globe. We have established valuable international trading relationships that have helped offset the U.S. trade deficit and fueled America’s rural economy.”Ultimately, though, farmers simply want to sell their products for a fair price, free of trade wars.“When Secretary Perdue and President Trump said they would be taking care of farmers if need be I knew that things with China weren’t going according to plan,” said Bret Davis, a Delaware County soybean farmer and a member of the American Soybean Association Governing Committee. “We don’t want to be taken care of. We want to have a free market. The way to solve this is for us to sell more soybeans to China, not less.”last_img read more

Three arrested in Amarnath pilgrim attack case: Police

first_imgJammu and Kashmir Police on Sunday said three people, alleged conspirators in the July 10 attack on Amarnath pilgrims, have been arrested by its Special Investigation Team (SIT).The men provided logistical help to four Lashker-e-Taiba (LeT) militants who carried out the attack that left eight people dead, IGP Munir Khan told the media here.The men, who had allegedly helped the four terrorists by providing them with vehicles and shelter, were arrested recently and taken into remand for further questioning, the police said.The police said the four LeT militants, led by Abu Ismail, a Pakistani national, had attempted an attack on Amarnath pilgrims on July 9, but were frustrated by heavy security arrangements.Another militant in the group of four had been identified as Yawar, a local recruiter for the LeT, the police said. Efforts are on to identify the other two, believed to be Pakistanis. The police also released pictures of Abu Ismail and Yawar.The the three “co-conspirators”— Bilal Ahmed Reshi, Aizaj Wagey and Zahoor Ahmed — had carried out reconnaissance exercises and chosen Botengo near Khanbal as the spot where the attack could be carried out, the police added.The trio had also provided shelter to the four militants in Khudwani and Sriguffwara of South Kashmir, Khan said. Bilal’s elder brother Adil, an alleged Lashker-e-Taiba terrorist, was killed by security forces earlier this year.The Jammu and Kashmir Police had constituted an SIT led by Deputy Inspector General (South Kashmir) Swayam Prakash Pani to probe the attack on the pilgrims.last_img read more

Glossary

first_imgPlane talkSometimes you avoid eye contact, sometimes you share a newspaper and sometimes you open up your heart. Here are some in-flight conversations that the nation will remember for long.On January 15When the late Sunanda Pushkar and former minister Shashi Tharoor were having a spat on a flight from,Plane talkSometimes you avoid eye contact, sometimes you share a newspaper and sometimes you open up your heart. Here are some in-flight conversations that the nation will remember for long.On January 15When the late Sunanda Pushkar and former minister Shashi Tharoor were having a spat on a flight from Thiruvananthapuram to Delhi, the then I&B minister Manish Tewari heard it all seated behind.Just Last weekBabul Supriyo confessed how he bagged a BJP ticket for the 2014 General Election. He happened to be on the same flight as yoga guru Ramdev on February 28. As he overheard the Baba discussing ticket distribution, he asked if he could get one too. It was his.When Indira Gandhiwas assassinated on October 31, 1984, Pranab Mukherjee was on the same flight as Rajiv Gandhi-from Kolkata to Delhi. What did they talk about? No one quite knows, but speculation runs rife that it was the in-flight talk that led to Mukherjee’s six-year ouster from power, till he was resurrected by P.V. Narasimha Rao, who happened to be on the same flight but was seated quietly.After a Sleeplessnight next to a loud snorer on his way to London, Amitabh Bachchan had asked the late Dr K. Anji Reddy, chief of Dr Reddy’s Laboratory, “Do you have a drug for snorers?†“No, but I am working on a drug for Alzheimer’s,†Reddy had said, praising him for his role as an Alzheimer’s patient in Black. Donepezil, an Alzheimers drug, has just hit the market.advertisementHISTORY OR HISTRIONICSWhat happens when a film goes back in time to thousands of years? Ask Ashutosh Gowariker, who has decided to create yet another epic movie, Mohenjo-Daro, on the 5,000-year-old city that remains a historical puzzle. A smart choice. The Jodhaa Akbar director won’t face the long arm of the law or people baying for his blood this time around. Here’s what you can expect.What language did they use? No one knows, except that, well, they did not speak Hindi. New research shows their script to be an old version of Tamil. Get ready for a very different Hrithik. He will have to sport a beard, if not a shaved upper lip (say historians), long hair (he looks nice in that) held in place by a hairband or in a bun (Mohenjo-Daro men did that a lot) and wear a toga, with one bare shoulder. Weird, but leaves plenty of scope for the Greek God of Bollywood to show off his muscles. The Censor Board will be aghast if the film is too close to history. Remember the bronze dancing girl of Mohenjo-Daro? She had bangles all the way up one arm and nothing else on. Women in those days mostly went around naked or in tiny skirts.Expect a Bond girl moment at the Great Bath of Mohenjo-Daro, the world’s first swimming pool, with a skimpily clad heroine stepping out of the water and breaking into a song.But who will be the heroine? A cat fight is on between three beauties-Kareena Kapoor, Priyanka Chopra and Sonakshi Sinha-for the plum role. Check out some ancient figurines. Who do you think has the best chance?HOT, HOTTER, HOTTESTEach of the last three decades has been warmer than the previous one, reports the World Meteorological Organization. And 2014 is poised to become the hottest year on record.ALLAHABADReached 48.3°C in June, the hottest city as an intense heat wave swept across north India.NAGPURMercury soared to 47.3°C, the highest in last 11 years, and one of the highest maximum temperatures in the country.DELHIDelhi hit the highest June temperature in 19 years with the mercury zooming to 47.2°C.ADILABADContinuously above 45°C in June, one of the worst affected in the severe heat wave across coastal Andhra Pradesh and Telangana.KOLKATARecorded the second-highest temperature in a decade (41.2°C), with discomfort index zooming to 67.6°C in June, 13 notches above the comfort level.GUWAHATIMaximum temperature touched 40.1°C, equalling the all-time high of April 1999 and about 9°C above the average of 31°C.MUMBAIFirst time since 1951, the minimum temperature for June rose above 27.9°C.last_img read more