Ford will pay 17 million to settle MyFord Touchrelated lawsuit

first_imgOwners and lessees with this older system are in for at least $45 if they submit a claim. Ford Infotainment is a tricky part of in-car technology even today. As automakers gradually dipped into more tech-laden systems, some got it right, and some did not.After numerous complaints, Ford has settled a class-action lawsuit surrounding its MyFord Touch infotainment system. Law firm Hagens Berman said in a release on Tuesday that the automaker will pay $17 million, and both owners and lessees are eligible for compensation.Specifically, the litigation surrounds the system equipped in 2011-2013 Ford and Lincoln vehicles. The infotainment system was notorious for being unresponsive, crashing and freezing while driving. Other complaints surrounded inaccurate GPS information and the total inability to connect with a smartphone.Compensation amounts will be based on how often an owner or lessee needed to service their vehicle for an infotainment system repair. If that figure is three times or more, they will receive up to $400. Those that serviced the system twice will receive $250, and one appointment for a MyFord Touch fix will award an individual $100. Those who didn’t have any repairs done to the system but were, as the law firm said, “dissatisfied” with MyFord Touch will receive $45 by filing a claim.To help affected folks, a dedicated website is now online to submit a claim and to search through repair claims. For those who may not remember how many times they brought their vehicle in for a repair, the website will locate the records. Furthermore, any owners who made repairs outside the warranty period can apply for reimbursement for any out-of-pocket costs.California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia and Washington residents are the only individuals able to file a claim and people in those states must have purchased or leased a Ford or Lincoln from an authorized dealer before Aug. 9, 2013. Ford will automatically cut a check for anyone who doesn’t submit a claim and was the original vehicle owner, in amounts ranging from $20 to $55.As for Ford’s most-recent stab at infotainment, we’re happy to report Sync 3 is pretty darn good. 4 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Checking the tech in the 2020 Ford Explorer 3:16 29 Photos 2019 Mercedes-Benz GLC350e review: Premium plug-in hybrid feels like an efficiency half-step Share your voice Comments More From Roadshow 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Now playing: Watch this: Ford Tags Ford Auto Tech Car Industry Sync 3 gives Ford cars fast navigation, Android and iPhone love (pictures)last_img read more

Prices on Rise Days before Union Budget

first_imgJump in Petrol prices: Petrol prices went up by ₹1.69 per litre on Monday, in what is being termed as a ripple effect of the Iraq crisis, which have raised international gasoline rates.The price of Brent crude oil, which is the international standard, rose to $115 per barrel due to the situation in Iraq. Oil companies have also raised the price of diesel by ₹0.50.”Due to geo-political unrest in the Middle East, there has been significant increase in international oil prices. by more than $4 per barrel, and the Rupee-US dollar exchange rate has also deteriorated,” an official from Indian Oil Corp told the PTI.”The combined impact of both these factors has warranted an increase in petrol prices by Rs 1.69 per litre,” added official. The fuel prices could rise further more in some cities depending on the state levies.Jet fuel hike: With a hike in jet fuel brought into effect on Tuesday, airlines are expected to have no choice but to raise fares for air travel, as the fuel constitutes more than 40 percent of the total operating cost for an airline. Jet fuel prices were hiked by 0.6 percent on Tuesday. Prices of essential commodities have been on the rise just a few days before the Modi government’s first budget session in the Parliament on 7 July. In the last few days, prices of vegetables, especially onions, have seen a hike followed by that of fuel and LPG.Here is what the government and citizens are facing:Costlier Onions: Prices of onions have risen by 40 percent in the last two weeks to reach ₹18.50 per kilogram at Asia’s largest wholesale market for the vegetable at Lasalgaon in Maharashtra.Speculation about the weak monsoon is suspected to have driven the prices up. What has added to consumers’ woes is the increasing gap between wholesale prices and retail prices of onions, reportedly because of hoarding.The consumer affairs department is said to have written to state governments to keep tabs on artificial scarcity, The Economic Times reported.LPG prices rise: Consumers will now have to pay ₹16.50 more for every cylinder they get after their quota of 12 subsidised cylinders, as the price of cooking gas (LPG) was hiked on Tuesday. The hike in non-subsidised cooking gas is a first in last six months.last_img read more

Report Says Houston Can Learn From Floodplain Buyout Programs In Other Cities

first_img X 00:00 /00:58 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Marissa CummingsA neighborhood street near the Addicks and Barker Reservoirs is seen inundated with floodwaters after Hurricane HarveyA new report says government buyouts of flood-prone homes could move faster if more local money was available.Harris County’s buyout program is the biggest in the country, the report from Rice University notes, but it relies mostly on slow-moving federal money. The report looked at how officials managed to speed up the process in Charlotte (North Carolina) in part by created new local fees. “We’re able to buy properties immediately after a flood, versus if we relied on federal funding, usually that doesn’t happen until years afterwards,” said Dave Canaan, Water & Land Resources Director for ​Mecklenburg County, home to Charlotte.Still, experts cautioned that the success of buyout programs shouldn’t be judged solely on speed.Christof Spieler, with the Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium, said officials have to make sure buyouts don’t create new housing problems.“If the government is buying out your home for the appraised value of that home, if you’re living in an old home that may not be in good condition, you may not be able to afford a place to live for that amount of money,” he said.The Rice report notes that Harris County officials have committed to more local funding for buyouts since Harvey, but it cautions that those commitments might only be temporary. Sharelast_img read more

Wooden Shigir idol found to be over twice as old as Egyptian

first_img © 2018 Phys.org Explore further The Shigir Idol was discovered in an ancient peat bog by miners in Russia back in 1890. Early analysis showed that it was made entirely of larch wood and was constructed from several chunks. It remained preserved for thousands of years because of antimicrobial properties found in the peat. The idol was also covered extensively with markings, some of which depicted tiny human faces. To this day, no one knows what most of the markings depict. It was also noted that some of the original pieces of the idol had been lost—it is believed that it originally stood approximately five meters tall. In 1997, a team in Russia used radiocarbon dating to estimate the age of the icon and found it to be approximately 9,500 years old.Experts have studied the carvings on the idol over the years, and many have suggested they likely represent a form of art, possibly linked with spiritual or religious activities.Recently, the team in Germany expressed interest it taking a closer look at the idol, which is normally housed in the Sverdlovsk Regional Museum, in Russia. Arrangements were made for the idol to be shipped to Germany, where it was studied, along with other original material found in the peat bog. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, the team found the true age of the idol to be approximately 11,500 years old, placing its creation at around the time of the end of the Ice Age. That age also makes it the oldest known wood monumental sculpture ever found and more than twice the age of the Egyptian pyramids. The researchers report that they also found another face carved into the wood, bringing the total to eight. Their findings suggest that researchers looking to better understand very early human behavior perhaps need to widen their search beyond the Fertile Crescent. Citation: Wooden Shigir idol found to be over twice as old as Egyptian pyramids (2018, April 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-wooden-shigir-idol-egyptian-pyramids.html Credit: Antiquity (2018). DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2018.48 Journal information: Antiquity More information: Mikhail Zhilin et al. Early art in the Urals: new research on the wooden sculpture from Shigir, Antiquity (2018). DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2018.48AbstractThe carved wooden object uncovered from the Shigir peat bog in the Sverdlovsk region towards the end of the nineteenth century remains one of the oldest, known examples of monumental anthropomorphic sculpture from anywhere in the world. Recent application of new analytical techniques has led to the discovery of new imagery on its surface, and has pushed the date of the piece back to the earliest Holocene. The results of these recent analyses are placed here in the context of local and extra-local traditions of comparable prehistoric art. This discussion highlights the unique nature of the find and its significance for appreciating the complex symbolic world of Early Holocene hunter-gatherers. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Rejection from ‘American Idol’ provides insights into perseverance A team of researchers in Germany has found evidence suggesting that the famous wooden Shirgir Idol is actually 11,500 years old. The team has documented their efforts and findings in a paper published on the Cambridge University Press site Antiquity. Credit: Public Domainlast_img read more