NEIGHBOR NEWS Whats Making Headlines In Tewksbury

first_imgYour Tewksbury Today is Tewksbury’s premiere online hyperlocal news source. Follow YTT on Facebook and Twitter.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNEIGHBOR NEWS: What’s Making Headlines In Tewksbury?In “Community”NEIGHBOR NEWS: What’s Making Headlines In Tewksbury?In “Community”NEIGHBOR NEWS: What’s Making Headlines In Tewksbury?In “Community” TEWKSBURY, MA — Ever wonder what’s making news next door in Tewksbury? Bill Gilman, editor of Your Tewksbury Today, has the answer!Below is a collection of top Tewksbury stories, primarily written by Gilman, that were recently published on his popular website.Top Tewksbury Stories (May 20, 2019 to May 27, 2019)Tewksbury Telemedia Announces Debut Of Three Unique Cable Access ChannelsState Rep. Nguyen Presented With “Women’s Empowerment Award”Tewksbury Looking To Fill Multiple Board VacanciesSmith, White Named TMHS-Rotary Club Hats Off Winners for MayEssex Baseball Association To Bring 19th Century Vintage Baseball To Tewksburylast_img read more

DU teachers students protest at attacks by BCL men

first_imgStudents and teachers of International Relations department at Dhaka University on Monday formed a human chain protesting at attacks on teachers and students, allgedly by BCL men on SundayStudents and teachers of International Relations department at Dhaka University on Monday protested against the assault on associate professor Mohammad Tanzimuddin Khan and two other teachers of the university allegedly by BCL men.They formed a human chain on the campus carrying placards inscribed with different messages such as “Why are teachers assaulted” and “We want justice”.The teachers and students under the banner of ‘Students of International Relations’ formed the human chain in front of Social Science faculty around 11am Monday, a day after ruling Awami League-backed Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) men attacked teachers and students who protested at arrest of quota reform activists.The teachers and students of the International Relations demanded exemplary punishment of the attackers.Professor Md Abdul Mannan, and lecturers Lamea Momen and Md. Ali Siddiquee were present at the human chain.They also brought out a procession on the campus.Tanzimuddin Khan, professor Fahmidul Haq and associate professor Abdur Razzaque Khan of Mass Communication and Journalism department and some quota movement activists were assaulted allegedly by leaders and activists of BCL during their human chain programme at the central Shaheed Minar premises on Sunday.Also, t6he teachers and students of Economics department of the university formed another human chain protesting at assault on two students by three BCL activists and demanding safe campus.Professor MM Akash of the department said the attack on the students by the BCL activists in broad daylight is not tolerable. He demanded expulsion of the attackers.”It is duty of the university administration to ensure security on the campus. If they fail, they should resign. They should also ensure students’ freedom of speech.”Earlier on Saturday evening, some BCL activists beat up two students of Economics department of Dhaka University in front of Surja Sen Hall.last_img read more

Fire crews in grim search for Californias dead

first_imgAn aircraft flies past a helicopter going down to collect water at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, on 11 November 2018, as the battle to control the Woolsey Fire continues. Near Los Angeles, where the `Woolsey Fire` is threatening mansions and mobile homes alike in the coastal celebrity redoubt of Malibu, the death toll has been limited to two victims found in a vehicle on a private driveway. Photo: AFPSearch teams recovered bodies from the devastation left by California’s most destructive ever wildfire on Sunday, as the statewide death toll rose to at least 29 with high winds hampering the effort to save lives and homes.Firefighters took advantage of a brief calm overnight to make headway against the multiple blazes, but conditions were hellish on Sunday, with winds forecast to gust as high as 60 miles (100 kilometers) an hour, and humidity low.In fire zones north and south, acrid smoke blanketed the sky for miles, the sun barely visible. On the ground, cars caught in the blaze were reduced to mangled metal carcasses, while power lines were gnawed by the flames.The largest inferno — the so-called “Camp Fire” in the northern foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains — has destroyed 6,700 homes, business and other buildings in the town of Paradise, effectively wiping it off the map.At least 25 people have lost their lives in and around the community of 27,000, according to an official count by authorities.In Magalia, north of Paradise, workers from a local mortuary team recover a body on Sunday, which was put into a blue bag and loaded into a hearse.And in the hills above the nearby Concow area, a recovery team discovered the body of another person near several cars on a dirt road running alongside a cannabis farm.The blaze is now tied with the 1991 “Tunnel Fire” as the second-deadliest fire to hit the state. The deadliest was the “Griffith Park Fire” in 1933, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire).At the southern end of the state, where the “Woolsey Fire” is threatening mansions and mobile homes alike in the coastal celebrity redoubt of Malibu, the death toll has been limited to two victims found in a vehicle on a private driveway.Los Angeles County Fire chief Daryl Osby told reporters of his gratitude to firefighters “who’ve done all they could do save tens of thousands of people’s lives and thousands of people’s homes.”‘ New abnormal ‘Rescuers spent hours on Saturday collecting bodies around Paradise and placing them in a black hearse. Body parts were transported by bucket, while intact remains were carried in body bags.At the Holly Hills Mobile Estate the mobile homes had been reduced to smoldering piles of debris. Yellow police tape delineated spots that were tagged “Doe C” and “Doe D,” a grim marker of the bodies that had recently been removed.Locals fled the danger, but police told AFP some farmers returned to check on their cattle.Fanned by strong winds, the “Camp Fire” has so far scorched 111,000 acres (45,000 hectares) and is 25 percent contained, Cal Fire said. So far, three of the more than 4,000 firefighters deployed have been injured.They estimate they will need three weeks to fully contain the blaze.Evacuation orders have been issued to more than 250,000 people across California, with authorities urging residents not to ignore warnings to flee.”This is not the new normal, this is the new abnormal. And this new abnormal will continue, certainly in the next 10 to 15 to 20 years,” California Governor Jerry Brown told a news conference on Sunday.”Unfortunately, the best science is telling us that the dryness, warmth, drought, all those things, they’re gonna intensify,” he said, referring to conditions conducive to fires.’Dangerously wrong’Almost 6,000 miles away, president Donald Trump, in France for World War I commemorations, drew fierce criticism for an unsympathetic reaction to the devastation.”There is no reason for these massive, deadly and costly forest fires in California except that forest management is so poor,” Trump tweeted, threatening to withdraw federal support.Brian Rice, the head of the California Professional Firefighters, slammed the tweet as “ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines.”He said the president’s claim that forest policies were mismanaged “is dangerously wrong.”The tweet also drew political criticism. Republican Senator Cory Gardner told ABC News on Sunday: “I don’t think it’s appropriate to threaten funding.”That’s not going to happen. Funding will be available. It always is available to our people wherever they are, whatever disaster they are facing.”Malibu mansions in flamesIn southern California, the “Woolsey Fire” engulfed parts of Thousand Oaks, where the community is still shell-shocked after a Marine Corps veteran shot dead 12 people in a country music bar on Wednesday.It has consumed around 83,000 acres, destroyed at least 177 buildings and was ten percent contained, Cal Fire said Sunday.The blaze reached the Paramount Ranch, destroying sets used for hundreds of productions including HBO’S sci-fi western “Westworld,” network officials said.Keegan Gibbs, 33, was crushed to find his childhood Malibu home had been consumed by flames.”Malibu is a really small community and gets a bad rap for being this kind of elitist, snobby place, and it’s exactly the opposite,” Gibbs told The Los Angeles Times.last_img

11 Trade Ministers Reach Deal On Pacific Trade Without US

first_imgPhoto via Twitter Justin Trudeau‏ @JustinTrudeauJapanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe and Canada’s Prime Minister Justin TrudeauIn a major breakthrough, trade ministers from 11 Pacific Rim countries said they reached a deal Saturday to proceed with the free-trade Trans-Pacific Partnership deal that was in doubt after President Donald Trump abandoned it.A statement issued in the early hours Saturday said an accord was reached on “core elements” of the 11-member pact. The compromise was delayed by last-minute disagreements that prevented the TPP leaders from meeting to endorse a plan on Friday.“Ministers are pleased to announce that they have agreed on the core elements of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership,” the 11 nations said in a statement.It said that the ministers maintained “the high standards, overall balance and integrity of the TPP while ensuring the commercial and other interests of all participants and preserving our inherent right to regulate, including the flexibility of the parties to set legislative and regulatory priorities.”In January, Trump pulled out of the deal that was championed by his predecessor Barack Obama. Leaders of the 11 countries remaining in the TPP had been due to meet and endorse a deal worked out in last-minute talks overnight.Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said earlier Friday that the 11 leaders had to postpone their meeting on the sidelines of the annual summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Danang, Vietnam. Abe spoke after meeting with Canadian Prime Ministers Justin Trudeau, who had said days earlier that Canada would not be rushed into an agreement.The TPP member countries are trying to find a way forward without the U.S., the biggest economy and, before Trump took office, one of its most assertive supporters. Trump has said he prefers country-to-country deals and is seeking to renegotiate several major trade agreements to, as he says, “put America first.”Trump reiterated his markedly different stance on trade before the 21-member APEC summit convened late Friday with a gala banquet.The U.S. president told an APEC business conference that “we are not going to let the United States be taken advantage of anymore.” He lambasted the World Trade Organization and other trade forums as unfair to the United States and reiterated his preference for bilateral trade deals, saying “I am always going to put America first.”Trump said he would not enter into large trade agreements, alluding to U.S. involvement in the North American Free Trade Agreement and the TPP.In contrast, Chinese President Xi Jinping told the same group that nations need to stay committed to economic openness or risk being left behind.The Chinese president drew loud applause when he urged support for the “multilateral trading regime” and progress toward a free-trade zone in the Asia-Pacific. China is not part of the TPP.APEC operates by consensus and customarily issues nonbinding statements. TPP commitments would eventually be ratified and enforced by its members.But even talks this week on a declaration to cap the APEC summit had to be extended for an extra half day as ministers haggled over wording. It’s unclear what the exact sticking points were, but officials have alluded to differences over the unequal impact more open trade has had on workers and concerns over automation in manufacturing that could leave many millions in a wide array of industries with no work to do.As a developing country with a fast-growing export sector, this year’s host country, Vietnam, has a strong interest in open trade and access for its exports to consumers in the West. The summit is an occasion for its leaders to showcase the progress its economy has made thanks largely to foreign investment and trade. Danang, Vietnam’s third largest city, is in the midst of a construction boom as dozens of resorts and smaller hotels pop up along its scenic coastline.APEC’s members are Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, the U.S. and Vietnam. Sharelast_img read more

30th Anniversary Of Program That Delivers Thanksgiving Meals To Homebound Elders

first_imgWikimedia CommonsThe year 2018 marks the 30th anniversary of a program of the Harris County Area Agency on Aging that delivers thousands of meals to homebound older adults.The agency is a division of the Houston Health Department and the program is called Houston Meals for the Elderly. In addition to Thanksgiving meals, the agency funds several local organizations to provide home delivered meals throughout the year.Deborah Moore, assistant director of human services for the Houston Health Department, noted that “while appreciative of the delicious meal, these older adults also really look forward to the visit on Thanksgiving morning.”The agency delivered 3,000 meals last Thanksgiving and has a goal of 4,000 for its 30th anniversary.The meals will be delivered from 10 sites across Harris County. Sharelast_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Tuesday August 9

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3u
From 5-7 P.M.
A discussion on Baltimore City Council’s passage of a $15 hour minimum wage with Councilman Carl Stokes and others. Plus, funding for the successful crime prevention program, “Operation Safe Streets,” may be in jeopardy. Our panel will discuss the plight of Safe Streets and violence in Baltimore.
These stories and much more on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes .last_img