Facebook to Launch App Center

first_imgAs for monetization, Brady writes, “Many developers have been successful with in-app purchases, but to support more types of apps on Facebook.com, we will give developers the option to offer paid apps. This is a simple-to-implement payment feature that lets people pay a flat fee to use an app on Facebook.com.”App detail pages must receive Facebook approval, and those who submit completed pages before May 18 will be given review priority.CNN.com reports Facebook operates under an Apple-like revenue split with brands selling through the social network, pocketing 30 percent of each sale. While it is unclear whether Facebook’s fees will be in addition to what the App Store typically charges for download, the announcement is generating buzz throughout the industry. “We’re still gathering information about the App Center, but Atlantic Media currently reaches millions of monthly users via Facebook platform through our brand page and audience sharing, and thus the potential to reach one billion users with Atlantic Media Apps is certainly attractive. The App Center should become an important distribution channel for Atlantic Media as we accelerate our investment in mobile and app development on all platforms, including HTML5,” Scott Havens, SVP of finance and digital operations with Atlantic Media, tells FOLIO:. “Having said that, Facebook is smartly launching the App Center to help Facebook compete against Apple, Google, Microsoft and other social media networks, not necessarily to help Atlantic Media drive incremental revenue, traffic or engagement. So of course, understanding the ROI and/or the tradeoffs—such as using FB login—is important for a media company our size to evaluate before we invest too much time.” The App Center will be available on the Web, as well as for iOS and Android systems. If an app requires installation, Facebook will redirect the user to either the App Store or Google Play to complete the process. Just in case publishers didn’t have enough platforms to push their apps through already, Facebook is jumping into the game with the debut of its App Center. In a post on its Facebook Developers page, software engineer Aaron Brady urges, “All developers should start preparing today to make sure their app is included for the launch.”Positioned as “the new, central place to find great apps,” the App Center mandates an app detail page for each submission. FB will decide which products to promote by monitoring app success through its Insights feature, a system already in place for brand pages (the tool monitors likes, number of users “talking about this,” weekly reach and a combined social circle tally dubbed “Friends of Fans”). Brady writes, “Well-designed apps that people enjoy will be prominently displayed.” Quality is quantified through characteristics such as “an easy-to-use interface, clear content, value to users and no significant bugs”; minimal advertising; positive user feedback; and included apps must “set clear expectations about what user activity it shares on Facebook, and when.”last_img read more

Bob Mankoff Retires as Cartoon Editor after 40 Years at The New

first_imgBob Mankoff, cartoon editor at The New Yorker, will retire on May 1. Just 72-years-old, Mankoff will continue as a regular contributing artist, in addition to editing an upcoming anthology, The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons. Mankoff, who took over the cartoon desk in 1997, sold his first cartoon to The New Yorker in 1977, giving him a 40-year career at one of the most distinctive art sections in publishing. Replacing Mankoff is Emma Allen, editor of The Talk of the Town and Shouts & Murmurs. She joined The New Yorker in 2011, just one year after graduating from Yale with BA’s in English and Studio Art.  “He brought a real sense of originality to this work, but, even more important, a sense of the artist and their interests,” Remnick wrote. He is credited with creating one of the most replicated cartoons in the magazine’s history, “How About Never–Is Never Good For You?” In a memo to staff today, editor-in-chief David Remnick described Mankoff as sustaining the magazine’s voice while bringing new and unique artists onto its pages. ​last_img read more

Ford will pay 17 million to settle MyFord Touchrelated lawsuit

first_imgOwners and lessees with this older system are in for at least $45 if they submit a claim. Ford Infotainment is a tricky part of in-car technology even today. As automakers gradually dipped into more tech-laden systems, some got it right, and some did not.After numerous complaints, Ford has settled a class-action lawsuit surrounding its MyFord Touch infotainment system. Law firm Hagens Berman said in a release on Tuesday that the automaker will pay $17 million, and both owners and lessees are eligible for compensation.Specifically, the litigation surrounds the system equipped in 2011-2013 Ford and Lincoln vehicles. The infotainment system was notorious for being unresponsive, crashing and freezing while driving. Other complaints surrounded inaccurate GPS information and the total inability to connect with a smartphone.Compensation amounts will be based on how often an owner or lessee needed to service their vehicle for an infotainment system repair. If that figure is three times or more, they will receive up to $400. Those that serviced the system twice will receive $250, and one appointment for a MyFord Touch fix will award an individual $100. Those who didn’t have any repairs done to the system but were, as the law firm said, “dissatisfied” with MyFord Touch will receive $45 by filing a claim.To help affected folks, a dedicated website is now online to submit a claim and to search through repair claims. For those who may not remember how many times they brought their vehicle in for a repair, the website will locate the records. Furthermore, any owners who made repairs outside the warranty period can apply for reimbursement for any out-of-pocket costs.California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia and Washington residents are the only individuals able to file a claim and people in those states must have purchased or leased a Ford or Lincoln from an authorized dealer before Aug. 9, 2013. Ford will automatically cut a check for anyone who doesn’t submit a claim and was the original vehicle owner, in amounts ranging from $20 to $55.As for Ford’s most-recent stab at infotainment, we’re happy to report Sync 3 is pretty darn good. 4 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Checking the tech in the 2020 Ford Explorer 3:16 29 Photos 2019 Mercedes-Benz GLC350e review: Premium plug-in hybrid feels like an efficiency half-step Share your voice Comments More From Roadshow 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Now playing: Watch this: Ford Tags Ford Auto Tech Car Industry Sync 3 gives Ford cars fast navigation, Android and iPhone love (pictures)last_img read more

Fire crews in grim search for Californias dead

first_imgAn aircraft flies past a helicopter going down to collect water at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, on 11 November 2018, as the battle to control the Woolsey Fire continues. Near Los Angeles, where the `Woolsey Fire` is threatening mansions and mobile homes alike in the coastal celebrity redoubt of Malibu, the death toll has been limited to two victims found in a vehicle on a private driveway. Photo: AFPSearch teams recovered bodies from the devastation left by California’s most destructive ever wildfire on Sunday, as the statewide death toll rose to at least 29 with high winds hampering the effort to save lives and homes.Firefighters took advantage of a brief calm overnight to make headway against the multiple blazes, but conditions were hellish on Sunday, with winds forecast to gust as high as 60 miles (100 kilometers) an hour, and humidity low.In fire zones north and south, acrid smoke blanketed the sky for miles, the sun barely visible. On the ground, cars caught in the blaze were reduced to mangled metal carcasses, while power lines were gnawed by the flames.The largest inferno — the so-called “Camp Fire” in the northern foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains — has destroyed 6,700 homes, business and other buildings in the town of Paradise, effectively wiping it off the map.At least 25 people have lost their lives in and around the community of 27,000, according to an official count by authorities.In Magalia, north of Paradise, workers from a local mortuary team recover a body on Sunday, which was put into a blue bag and loaded into a hearse.And in the hills above the nearby Concow area, a recovery team discovered the body of another person near several cars on a dirt road running alongside a cannabis farm.The blaze is now tied with the 1991 “Tunnel Fire” as the second-deadliest fire to hit the state. The deadliest was the “Griffith Park Fire” in 1933, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire).At the southern end of the state, where the “Woolsey Fire” is threatening mansions and mobile homes alike in the coastal celebrity redoubt of Malibu, the death toll has been limited to two victims found in a vehicle on a private driveway.Los Angeles County Fire chief Daryl Osby told reporters of his gratitude to firefighters “who’ve done all they could do save tens of thousands of people’s lives and thousands of people’s homes.”‘ New abnormal ‘Rescuers spent hours on Saturday collecting bodies around Paradise and placing them in a black hearse. Body parts were transported by bucket, while intact remains were carried in body bags.At the Holly Hills Mobile Estate the mobile homes had been reduced to smoldering piles of debris. Yellow police tape delineated spots that were tagged “Doe C” and “Doe D,” a grim marker of the bodies that had recently been removed.Locals fled the danger, but police told AFP some farmers returned to check on their cattle.Fanned by strong winds, the “Camp Fire” has so far scorched 111,000 acres (45,000 hectares) and is 25 percent contained, Cal Fire said. So far, three of the more than 4,000 firefighters deployed have been injured.They estimate they will need three weeks to fully contain the blaze.Evacuation orders have been issued to more than 250,000 people across California, with authorities urging residents not to ignore warnings to flee.”This is not the new normal, this is the new abnormal. And this new abnormal will continue, certainly in the next 10 to 15 to 20 years,” California Governor Jerry Brown told a news conference on Sunday.”Unfortunately, the best science is telling us that the dryness, warmth, drought, all those things, they’re gonna intensify,” he said, referring to conditions conducive to fires.’Dangerously wrong’Almost 6,000 miles away, president Donald Trump, in France for World War I commemorations, drew fierce criticism for an unsympathetic reaction to the devastation.”There is no reason for these massive, deadly and costly forest fires in California except that forest management is so poor,” Trump tweeted, threatening to withdraw federal support.Brian Rice, the head of the California Professional Firefighters, slammed the tweet as “ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines.”He said the president’s claim that forest policies were mismanaged “is dangerously wrong.”The tweet also drew political criticism. Republican Senator Cory Gardner told ABC News on Sunday: “I don’t think it’s appropriate to threaten funding.”That’s not going to happen. Funding will be available. It always is available to our people wherever they are, whatever disaster they are facing.”Malibu mansions in flamesIn southern California, the “Woolsey Fire” engulfed parts of Thousand Oaks, where the community is still shell-shocked after a Marine Corps veteran shot dead 12 people in a country music bar on Wednesday.It has consumed around 83,000 acres, destroyed at least 177 buildings and was ten percent contained, Cal Fire said Sunday.The blaze reached the Paramount Ranch, destroying sets used for hundreds of productions including HBO’S sci-fi western “Westworld,” network officials said.Keegan Gibbs, 33, was crushed to find his childhood Malibu home had been consumed by flames.”Malibu is a really small community and gets a bad rap for being this kind of elitist, snobby place, and it’s exactly the opposite,” Gibbs told The Los Angeles Times.last_img